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The TransactionScope expects a call to its Complete method as follows. Otherwise the transaction will not be committed.

using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    /* Perform transactional work here */

    scope.Complete();
}

Wouldn't an implementation that assumes success have been more appropriate? This would mean that less code would be required in the standard case (success).

In the case of an exception or a call to a method such as 'Rollback' (this method does not currently exist) the transaction could be rolled back.

using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    /* Perform transactional work here */

     if(problemOccurred)
     {
         scope.Rollback();
     }
}

Note that the problemOccurred flag would only be required in cases where the problem did not result in an exception. In this case, the rollback would be performed automatically.

I am interested in gaining further insight into why this implementation was used.

Update: A couple of the answers so far argued that a try-catch block would be required if the implementation that I described were used. This is not the case. The transaction is automatically rolled back when an exception is not handled within the using block. This is the case in both the existing implementation and the one that I described. See 'Completing a transaction scope' section here for further details.

Update 2: I finally understand what was being explained in the answers. This is not a language construct that could have been interpreted any way that the language designers saw fit - it is an implementation of the IDisposable pattern. Without the call to Complete the code within the Dispose method would have no knowledge of whether it is being called as the result of the code within the using block being executed successfully or because an exception occurred. I was imagining something similar to the following where both transaction and rollback are keywords.

transaction
{
    /* Perform transactional work here */

     if(problemOccurred)
     {
         rollback;
     }
}

This would of course present problems if transaction options need to be passed to the TransactionScope.

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3  
Why isn't my comment automatically added when I change page, I shouldn't have to click [Add Comment]... –  cjk Jan 4 '10 at 13:20
1  
From update - The mechanism by which the transaction is rolled back in the face of exceptions is that you reach the end of the using block without calling Commit. I.e. that behaviour depends on the exact feature you want to remove. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '10 at 14:12
2  
Your update is wrong - the only reason it currently rolls back is exactly the behavior you are complaining about. It assumes failure - if an exception occurs, Complete() is never called and thus the transaction fails. There is no other magic mechanism at work catching the exceptions. –  Sander Jan 4 '10 at 14:17
2  
@Scott - try implementing this yourself - all you have to do is implement a class that implements IDisposable, and inside the Dispose method, you have to determine whether you're being disposed as a result of an exception being propagated - and you'll realise why it won't work. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '10 at 14:28
1  
Thanks Damien. I was thinking of TransactionScope as a language construct that could have been interpreted in any way that the language designers decided but it is nothing more than an implementation of IDisposable. –  Scott Munro Jan 4 '10 at 14:37
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It means that you don't need to put a manual try/finally (or catch) block (possibly with a "success" flag) in for the failure case. Try rewriting the above code to roll back on error, and look at how much messier it is...

Basically the normal desired behaviour is to only commit if it reaches the end of the block with no exceptions. The simplest way of achieving that is to put a method call to signify success at the end of the block.

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I don't think that a try block is required - see my comment in answer... stackoverflow.com/questions/1999461/… Do you agree? –  Scott Munro Jan 4 '10 at 13:51
    
No, because you're proposing changing that behaviour. Currently you don't need a try/catch block precisely because of the behaviour you're complaining about - failure is assumed unless you explicitly commit. –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '10 at 14:14
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This way, every transaction would look like this:

using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
  try
  {
    /* Perform transactional work here */
  }
  catch (Exception)
  {
    scope.Rollback();
    throw;
  }
}

Which is more code.

Edit:

Everything else is risky or bad style. You have to be absolutely sure that there wasn't any error when committing. When leaving the using block, you don't know if you leave it because an exception is thrown or because you just reached the end of it. When calling Complete, you know.

The transaction block syntax is already the simplest you can do. Just implement the transaction without any special error handling and commit it at the end. You don't have to care and rolling back when any error occurs. Consider, exceptions can be thrown in almost every single line of code (eg. NullReference, Overflows, InvalidOperation etc). So what could be easier than this?

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1  
If you use the scope.Complete() approach, when would a rollback occur if it was warranted? –  DOK Jan 4 '10 at 13:30
1  
An exception within the TransactionScope's using block would automatically roll back the transaction. Here an except from MSDN. "Failing to call this method aborts the transaction, because the transaction manager interprets this as a system failure, or equivalent to an exception thrown within the scope of transaction." Your try block is redundant. –  Scott Munro Jan 4 '10 at 13:45
    
Here is the link for the except. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms172152.aspx –  Scott Munro Jan 4 '10 at 13:55
3  
This answer was a hypothetical illustration of an auto-Complete()ing TransactionScope. The Microsoft comment applies only to a non-auto-Complete()ing version, the current version. –  yfeldblum Jan 4 '10 at 14:13
1  
@Scott - that would require changes inside the CLR to achieve - You'd need some magical new way of intercepting unhandled exceptions –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '10 at 14:23
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If the other implementation had been chosen, then people would be asking the converse question!

Seriously though, the default behaviour in a mechanism designed to protect against partial or incorrect updates surely has to be not to commit, doesn't it?

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I think the amount of code to write for success is, as @Jon Skeet says, less (and less ugly) the current way. From a transaction point of view, however, I would think that you would want to be pessimistic and assume that unless success was explicitly indicated you would roll it back. Committing a transaction in error is a much worse problem, in my opinion, than accidentally failing to commit a successful transaction because of a code error.

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