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I want determine the type of an attribute in a class. I am using setattr to set the value, and I would like to check the type that is expected, so that I can properly convert a string value before calling setattr.

How do you do this in python?

EDIT 1- Some additional information based on the answers so far:

I only know the name of the property that I want the type for, here is some code:

def populate_object_properties(values_as_strings, 
                               object_to_populate, 
                               properties_to_populate):
    for k in properties_to_populate:        
        value = values_as_strings.get(k)
        if value:
            setattr(object_to_populate, k, value)
        else:
            setattr(object_to_populate, k, None)

I want to be able test that value is the right type before I call setattr.

Edit 2- The reason why I need to validate the type, is that I'm using Google AppEngine's db.Model as the base type for the object_to_populate, and it doesn't like when a put a string into an int type. I was trying to keep the question as simple as possible, but maybe that piece of information makes a difference in how someone would answer.(?)

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1  
Why are you doing this? Simply set the value. If any object's actual type is incompatible with the expected methods, it will break. Why waste so much processing on type checking in a language that uses duck typing? –  S.Lott Jan 4 '10 at 15:30
    
I'm using Google AppEngine's db.model, and the properties of my db.model classes are enforced to a type. So if I try setting a Int property to a string, it throws an exception. –  mlsteeves Jan 4 '10 at 15:56
1  
You might want to look at db.djangoforms: code.google.com/appengine/articles/djangoforms.html –  dar Jan 5 '10 at 2:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In AppEngine, each model has a properties() class method, which returns the dict of properties you declared in your model. You can use it to check the types your model expects for each attribute:

def populate_object_properties(values_as_strings, 
                               object_to_populate, 
                               properties_to_populate):
    model_properties = object_to_populate.properties()
    for k in properties_to_populate:        
        value = values_as_strings.get(k)
        model_property = model_properties.get(k)
        if value:
            if isinstance(model_property, StringProperty):
                setattr(object_to_populate, k, str(value))
            elif isinstance(model_property, IntegerProperty):
                setattr(object_to_populate, k, int(value))
        else:
            setattr(object_to_populate, k, None)
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You seem to misunderstand how Python (the language) is designed. Attributes have no a-priori type (the language is dynamically typed), and therefore it makes, most of the time, little sense to try to coerce attributes explicitly when setting them.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using Google AppEngine's db.model, and the properties of my db.model classes are enforced to a type. So if I try setting a Int property to a string, it throws an exception. –  mlsteeves Jan 4 '10 at 15:55
    
Well the question then is why do you try setting an Int property to a string? Your application should know both what type it is receiving (e.g. from the user), and what type it should be converted to, so the conversion is trivial (e.g. y = int(x) if you want to do a string-to-int conversion). –  Antoine P. Jan 4 '10 at 16:39
    
I was using a function so that I could just pass in the request object, along with the db.model object, and a list of properties that I wanted moved from the request object into the db.model. This way I could call it from any web handler, with any db.model, and just change the list of properties, and I figured it would cut down on a lot of copy & paste code. So I needed to figure out at runtime what type I was dealing with, and convert the string from the request object. –  mlsteeves Jan 4 '10 at 23:16

you can use type(a.v) to check it, but if it doesn't have a default value, it could as well be None or undefined.

>> class A:
>>    v=10
>>    u=None
>> a=A()
>> print type(a.v)
<type 'int'>
>> print type(a.u)
<type 'NoneType'>
>> print type(a.w)
AttributeError
>> a.w=20
>> print type(a.w)
<type 'int'>

Python builtin tools for introspecion are not utterly useful here. I wouldn't rely on them in this case. For example xmlrpc libs provide more helpful ways for doing that.

If you only know the name use a.getattr('v') instead of a.v in the code above.

if type(getattr(object_to_populate, k))==type('a'):
    setattr(object_to_populate, k, value)

or use isinstance as suggested by extraneon, it's just the same.

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My questions wasn't as clear as it should have been, I've updated it. –  mlsteeves Jan 4 '10 at 14:24

Check a.__class__ , or maybe isinstance(obj, class) if you want to check if the type is as expected.

>>> a = 1
>>> a.__class__
<type 'int'>
>>> isinstance(a, int)
True

more to the point for you is probably:

>>> b = "10"
>>> isinstance(b, str)
True
>>> isinstance(b, int)
False
>>> int(b)
10

If your only goal is to set an attribute if the given argument can be expressed as an integer you could also use something like:

def convert(x):
    try:
      return int(x) # Or do something else with it
    except ValueError, e: 
      print "The value", x, "is not an integer"
      raise

convert(123) # => 123 
convert("123") # => 123
convert("abc") # => ValueError

Some extra text in the question makes me think of changing:

value = values_as_strings.get(k)

to

try:
  value = int( values_as_strings.get(k) )
except ValueError, e:
  # It's not an int or string with int contents, what to do?
  raise

resulting in:

try:
  setattr(object_to_populate, k, int( values_as_strings.get(k) ))
except:
  setattr(object_to_populate, k, None)
share|improve this answer
    
isinstance() seems to be the preferred way to go, based on the comments in the library reference manual for the types module. –  GregS Jan 4 '10 at 14:16
    
My questions wasn't as clear as it should have been, I've updated it. –  mlsteeves Jan 4 '10 at 14:23

Normally, a Python class (or instance thereof) carries no information regarding what types it "expects" any given attribute to have, because it has no such "expectation".

When you need to encode such metadata, rather than "rolling your own", you can use existing third party extensions like Enthought's Traits -- in Traits, among other features, you get:

Validation: A trait attribute's type is explicitly declared . The type is evident in the code, and only values that meet a programmer-specified set of criteria (i.e., the trait definition) can be assigned to that attribute. Note that the default value need not meet the criteria defined for assignment of values.

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Since python does not do type checking in this case you have to implement this feature by hand (or use existing libraries; see Alex Martellis answer).

One approach: Check if the value is an instance of the desired type, via isinstance.

Here is a modified version of your code, I'd start with ...

# 'pdict' is a dictionary of property-value pairs { 'property' : 'value', ... }
def populate_object_properties(object_to_populate, pdict):
    for p, v in pdict.items():
        setattr(object_to_populate, p, v)

Then we add the typecheck, for this example, we just want to populate the attributes of the object with objects of the same type as the currently used values ....

def populate_object_properties(object_to_populate, pdict):
    for p, v in pdict.items():

        current_value = getattr(p, v, None)
        klass = type(current_value)

        # allow setting the attribute, when 
        # 
        #    - the attribute did not exist before,
        #    - the attribute value was 'None',
        #    - the value to be inserted is of the same type as the current value

        if not current_value or isinstance(v, klass): 
            setattr(object_to_populate, p, v)

A couple of sidenotes:

# why don't you just take two parameters? 1) the object, 2) a dict with 
# property-value pairs?

def populate_object_properties(values_as_strings, 
                               object_to_populate, 
                               properties_to_populate):

    for k in properties_to_populate:        
        value = values_as_strings.get(k)

        # here you are branching on 'value', just to populate 
        # property 'k' with whah might have been 'value' before ..
        # it's nothing serious, though, just a bit too much to read

        if value:
            setattr(object_to_populate, k, value)
        else:
            setattr(object_to_populate, k, None)

        # you could simply write:
        # setattr(object_to_populate, k, value)

Further reading:

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Since explicit type-checking is so un-pythonic, consider just wrapping the value in int(). Then, if the value (whatever it is) can be coerced into an int, it will be. If it cannot be coerced into an int, then you need to throw an error anyway (which it will do automatically).

This is an example of the fundamental difference between "look before you leap" and "it's easier to ask forgiveness than to ask permission". Python isn't a "look before you leap" language, it's an "it's easier to ask forgiveness than ask permission" language. :)

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