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Here is my example.py file:

from myimport import *
def main():
    myimport2 = myimport(10)
    myimport2.myExample() 

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

And here is myimport.py file:

class myClass:
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number
    def myExample(self):
        result = myExample2(self.number) - self.number
        print(result)
    def myExample2(num):
        return num*num

When I run example.py file, i have the following error:

NameError: global name 'myExample2' is not defined

How can I fix that?

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2  
you need myExample2(self, num) and then refer to it as self.myExample2() –  Peter Varo Nov 15 '13 at 9:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a simple fix to your code.

from myimport import myClass #import the class you needed

def main():
    myClassInstance = myClass(10) #Create an instance of that class
    myClassInstance.myExample() 

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

And the myimport.py:

class myClass:
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number
    def myExample(self):
        result = self.myExample2(self.number) - self.number
        print(result)
    def myExample2(self, num): #the instance object is always needed 
        #as the first argument in a class method
        return num*num
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I see two errors in you code:

  1. You need to call myExample2 as self.myExample2(...)
  2. You need to add self when defining myExample2: def myExample2(self, num): ...
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You have to create an instance of the myClass class, and not the instance of the whole module(and i edit variables names to be less awful):

from myimport import *
def main():
    #myobj = myimport.myClass(10)
    # the next string is similar to above, you can do both ways
    myobj = myClass(10)
    myobj.myExample() 

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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While the other answers are correct, I wonder if there is really a need for myExample2() being a method. You could as well implement it standalone:

def myExample2(num):
    return num*num

class myClass:
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number
    def myExample(self):
        result = myExample2(self.number) - self.number
        print(result)

Or, if you want to keep your namespace clean, implement it as a method, but as it doesn't need self, as a @staticmethod:

def myExample2(num):
    return num*num

class myClass:
    def __init__(self, number):
        self.number = number
    def myExample(self):
        result = self.myExample2(self.number) - self.number
        print(result)
    @staticmethod
    def myExample2(num):
        return num*num
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