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I have a MSVC++ project fooproj that basically comes as input to the project I'm working on. I want to use CMake to add some sanity to the work on configuration of the solution+projects. Furthermore, I will be making changes (and contributing them back) in fooproj so I'd really like to properly import it into the solution that CMake generates so I'm looking at using include_external_msproject(), but I'd like to somehow control which configuration of fooproj I use for Debug/Release:

  • solution-lvl Debug -> project-lvl LibDebug
  • solution-lvl Release -> project-lvl LibRelease

Currently I do this manually after regenerating the solution using the Configuration Manager in VS, but I'd like to make it automatic. Is there some way to do that?

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1 Answer 1

I've been having this exact same issue while I port all our projects to use CMake.

A project I am importing has spaces in the configuration (Release md), and I am trying to map it to a solution config (Release_md), which is not possible I don't think.

As far as my researching has gone, there isn't any actual support for mapping the solution configurations to project configurations manually, since the CMake configurations are very nearly hardcoded to be 1:1 in Visual Studio. Different projects (that aren't imported as external ms projects) cannot have differing/less/more configs from the specified solution/CMake configuration.

I don't know about your case with fooproj specifically, but couldn't you add the Release and Debug configs to fooproj to match the solution configs from CMake?

Edit: Maybe this email thread can potentially help you? It mentions something about converting the external project to an imported target and mapping it that way.

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Release and Debug already exist in the project and I'm adding the other two project configs in order to not disturb other's work. –  Magnus Dec 11 '13 at 10:25

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