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I'm developing a dedicated game server on a linux machine, in C/C++ (mixed). I have the following snippet of code:

int sockfd=socket(AI_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
if(sockfd==-1)
{
    int err=errno;
    fprintf(stderr,"%s",strerror(err));
    exit(1);
}

My problem here, is that socket is returning -1 (implying a failure) and the error string is being printed, but it is "Success" (ERROR_SUCCESS).

Other notes:

  • I am requesting a socket on a port >1024 (out of context, but thought I'd mention)
  • I'm executing the app as the super user
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Did you cut/paste the code from you app or re-type? If this is a re-type I would check that your code has == (compare) in the if and not an =(assignment). –  Loki Astari Jan 4 '10 at 14:50
    
It's a `==' all right... –  aviraldg Jan 4 '10 at 14:50
    
What is the value of errno? –  Loki Astari Jan 4 '10 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I feel incredibly stupid. Carefully looking over my code, on my dev-computer shows:

if(sockfd==-1);
...
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4  
you are not the first one to do this, nor will you be the last one :-) –  moritz Jan 4 '10 at 15:05
    
This is exactly why ERROR_SUCCESS exists. :-) –  T.E.D. Jan 4 '10 at 15:08
    
aviraldg, you might want to accept your own answer so the question appears as solved. –  Georg Fritzsche Jan 4 '10 at 17:10
2  
Let this be a lesson: Always copy and paste real code that demonstrates the problem you're asking about. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 4 '10 at 18:02
    
@rob yes, of course, but not if you're programming on a different computer... –  aviraldg Jan 4 '10 at 21:49

Do you have multiple threads running? They could be overwriting the errno value.

Are there any lines of code between socket() and if() that you left out? Another function call could overwrite the errno.

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2  
errno is thread-local by C standard –  qrdl Jan 4 '10 at 14:58
1  
The C standard has no concept of threads. Though posix requires it to be thread local. –  nos Jan 4 '10 at 16:23

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