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/* test1.c */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int m = 11;
    system("./test2 m");
    return 0;
}

The above program prints 0, whereas I expect it to print 11.

/* test2.c */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int m = atoi(argv[1]);
    printf("%d\n", m);
    return 0;
}

Can someone provide an explanation? Also what would be the right way in order to print the desired 11?

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1  
It's your own fault to refuse to check whether the integer parsing succeeded. Making blind assumptions at every step is not the way to write programs. –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '13 at 11:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The system() function just takes a string as its argument. It doesn't know that you have a variable named m and that it should substitute that variable in the string (Which would not be possible in C anyways with such a syntax.)

That means you are executing your second program like this:

 ./test2 m

Your 2 program does atoi(argv[1]); , which will then be the same as atoi("m"); , which makes atoi() return 0.

You need to build up the string you want system() to execute

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char command[128];
    int m = 11;
    sprintf(command , "./test2 %d", m);
    system(command);
    return 0;
}
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You are passing the character m to the command line, not its value.

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C does not expand variables in string constants like perl so m in your command string is a string constant.

What you need to do is print the value of mto the command string:

/* test1.c */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int m = 11;
    char buf[100];
    sprintf(buf, "./test2 %d", m);
    system(buf);
    return 0;
}
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Funny how we came to the same solution here, y? But you forgot int before m ;) –  Atle Nov 15 '13 at 11:21
    
Thanks. My mistake was that I assumed test1.c was compiling, so I didn't scan for syntax errors. And not strange at all that they are the same, because it is the simplest and most straightforward solution. –  Klas Lindbäck Nov 15 '13 at 11:22
2  
I have this thread running in my head which scans for syntax errors all the time. Stops working about 2am, though. –  Atle Nov 15 '13 at 11:25
1  
I let the compiler do that, so my cores can focus all their processing cycles on semantic errors. –  Klas Lindbäck Nov 15 '13 at 11:27

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