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Is there a way in T-SQL to cast an nvarchar to int and return a default value or NULL if the conversion fails?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Yes :). Try this:

DECLARE @text AS NVARCHAR(10)

SET @text = '100'
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(@text) = 1 THEN CAST(@text AS INT) ELSE NULL END
-- returns 100

SET @text = 'XXX'
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(@text) = 1 THEN CAST(@text AS INT) ELSE NULL END
-- returns NULL

ISNUMERIC() has a few issues pointed by Fedor Hajdu.

It returns true for strings like $ (is currency), , or . (both are separators), + and -.

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Thanks for your answer. I hoped that there is something more elegant. –  Oliver Hanappi Jan 4 '10 at 15:13
2  
What about when the text value is numeric, but contains a number greater than an int column can store? –  Thomas G. Mayfield Sep 13 '12 at 16:59
1  
-1: Unfortunately, there are too many issues with ISNUMERIC for this answer to be of any use on unvalidated data (and you wouldn't need the ISNUMERIC check in the first place for properly-validated data). The author acknowledges the existence of these issues but does not address them. –  Douglas Jun 19 at 21:42

If you are on SQL Server 2012 (or newer):

Use the TRY_CONVERT function.

If you are on SQL Server 2005, 2008, or 2008 R2:

Create a user defined function. This will avoid the issues that Fedor Hajdu mentioned with regards to currency, fractional numbers, etc:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.TryConvertInt(@Value varchar(18))
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    SET @Value = REPLACE(@Value, ',', '')
    IF ISNUMERIC(@Value + 'e0') = 0 RETURN NULL
    IF ( CHARINDEX('.', @Value) > 0 AND CONVERT(bigint, PARSENAME(@Value, 1)) <> 0 ) RETURN NULL
    DECLARE @I bigint =
        CASE
        WHEN CHARINDEX('.', @Value) > 0 THEN CONVERT(bigint, PARSENAME(@Value, 2))
        ELSE CONVERT(bigint, @Value)
        END
    IF ABS(@I) > 2147483647 RETURN NULL
    RETURN @I
END
GO

-- Testing
DECLARE @Test TABLE(Value nvarchar(50))    -- Result
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1234'            -- 1234
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1,234'           -- 1234
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1234.0'          -- 1234
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '-1234'           -- -1234
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '$1234'           -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1234e10'         -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1234 5678'       -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '123-456'         -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '1234.5'          -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT '123456789000000' -- NULL
INSERT INTO @Test SELECT 'N/A'             -- NULL
SELECT Value, dbo.TryConvertInt(Value) FROM @Test

Reference: I used this page extensively when creating my solution.

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Anyone get this to work? I created a function as suggested and find it throws conversion errors using the proposed test function. I imagine I'm missing something here... –  Keith Hoffman Apr 30 at 7:45
    
Still works for me. What error are you getting? –  Joseph Sturtevant Apr 30 at 16:21
    
@KeithHoffman Works great for me! +1 Joseph, thanks! –  NReilingh Aug 2 at 21:17

I would rather create a function like TryParse or use T-SQL TRY-CATCH block to get what you wanted.

ISNUMERIC doesn't always work as intended. The code given before will fail if you do:

SET @text = '$'

$ sign can be converted to money datatype, so ISNUMERIC() returns true in that case. It will do the same for '-' (minus), ',' (comma) and '.' characters.

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2  
True :(. ISNUMERIC() returns 1 also for , and .. –  Grzegorz Gierlik May 4 '11 at 9:16
1  
...except you cannot use TRY-CATCH inside a function (at least not in my SQL 2005 database)...link –  Etherman Mar 30 '12 at 14:11

Joseph's answer pointed out ISNUMERIC also handles scientific notation like '1.3e+3' but his answer doesn't handle this format of number.

Casting to a money or float first handles both the currency and scientific issues:

IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[TryConvertInt]') AND type in (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF', N'FS', N'FT'))
DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[TryConvertInt]
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.TryConvertInt(@Value varchar(18))
RETURNS bigint
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @IntValue bigint;

    IF (ISNUMERIC(@Value) = 1)
        IF (@Value like '%e%')
            SET @IntValue = CAST(Cast(@Value as float) as bigint);
        ELSE
            SET @IntValue = CAST(CAST(@Value as money) as bigint);
    ELSE
        SET @IntValue = NULL;

    RETURN @IntValue;
END

The function will fail if the number is bigger than a bigint.

If you want to return a different default value, leave this function so it is generic and replace the null afterwards:

SELECT IsNull(dbo.TryConvertInt('nan') , 1000);
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I know it's not pretty but it is simple. Try this:

declare @AlpaNumber nvarchar(50) = 'ABC'
declare @MyNumber int = 0
begin Try
select @MyNumber = case when ISNUMERIC(@AlpaNumber) = 1 then cast(@AlpaNumber as int) else 0 end
End Try
Begin Catch
    -- Do nothing
End Catch 

if exists(select * from mytable where mynumber = @MyNumber)
Begin
print 'Found'
End
Else
Begin
 print 'Not Found'
End
share|improve this answer

As has been mentioned, you may run into several issues if you use ISNUMERIC:

-- Incorrectly gives 0:
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC('-') = 1 THEN CAST('-' AS INT) END   

-- Error (conversion failure):
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC('$') = 1 THEN CAST('$' AS INT) END
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC('4.4') = 1 THEN CAST('4.4' AS INT) END
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC('1,300') = 1 THEN CAST('1,300' AS INT) END

-- Error (overflow):
SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC('9999999999') = 1 THEN CAST('9999999999' AS INT) END

If you want a reliable conversion, you'll need to code one yourself. The snippet below works on non-negative integers. It checks that your string does not contain any non-digit characters, is not empty, and does not overflow (by exceeding the maximum value for the int type). However, it also gives NULL for valid integers whose length exceeds 10 characters due to leading zeros.

SELECT 
    CASE WHEN @text NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%' THEN
         CASE WHEN LEN(@text) BETWEEN 1 AND 9 
                OR LEN(@text) = 10 AND @text <= '2147483647' 
              THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
         END
    END 

If you want to support any number of leading zeros, use the below. The nested CASE statements, albeit unwieldy, are required to promote short-circuit evaluation and reduce the likelihood of errors (arising, for example, from passing a negative length to LEFT).

SELECT 
    CASE WHEN @text NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%' THEN
         CASE WHEN LEN(@text) BETWEEN 1 AND 9 THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
              WHEN LEN(@text) >= 10 THEN
              CASE WHEN LEFT(@text, LEN(@text) - 10) NOT LIKE '%[^0]%'
                    AND RIGHT(@text, 10) <= '2147483647'
                   THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
              END
         END
    END

If you want to support positive and negative integers with any number of leading zeros:

SELECT 
         -- Positive integers (or 0):
    CASE WHEN @text NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%' THEN
         CASE WHEN LEN(@text) BETWEEN 1 AND 9 THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
              WHEN LEN(@text) >= 10 THEN
              CASE WHEN LEFT(@text, LEN(@text) - 10) NOT LIKE '%[^0]%'
                    AND RIGHT(@text, 10) <= '2147483647'
                   THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
              END
         END
         -- Negative integers:
         WHEN LEFT(@text, 1) = '-' THEN
         CASE WHEN RIGHT(@text, LEN(@text) - 1) NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%' THEN
              CASE WHEN LEN(@text) BETWEEN 2 AND 10 THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
                   WHEN LEN(@text) >= 11 THEN
                   CASE WHEN SUBSTRING(@text, 2, LEN(@text) - 11) NOT LIKE '%[^0]%'
                         AND RIGHT(@text, 10) <= '2147483648'
                        THEN CAST (@text AS INT)
                   END
              END
         END
    END

A conciser alternative (based on adrianm's comment):

SELECT
    CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(@text + '.e0') = 1 THEN 
         CASE WHEN CONVERT(float, @text) BETWEEN -2147483648 AND 2147483647 
              THEN CONVERT(int, @text) 
         END 
     END
share|improve this answer
    
To emphasise the point, short circuiting is not guaranteed, even with the CASE statement. –  Michael Green Jun 21 at 11:52
    
@MichaelGreen: I'd read that article; the last update states: "The owners of this code [?] have marked this bug as fixed. From their comments, it sounds like you are supposed to be able to rely on deterministic order of expression evaluation for CASE statements." Microsoft acknowledges that the bug might occur for aggregates, but not for scalars. –  Douglas Jun 21 at 12:38
    
Fair point @Douglas. I remember reading within the last couple of months a post by one of the brand-name bloggers on CASE short circuiting mot being reliable at compile time even if the run-time sequencing was honoured. I can't find that reference at this time, however. My motivation was to warn The Community that this may be a problem, depending on their version/ edition/ patch level and I used that link as an examplar, is all. –  Michael Green Jun 22 at 11:32
    
@MichaelGreen: Agreed; IMHO, this is/was a serious shortcoming in SQL Server that severely limits its usability for scenarios requiring data validation. –  Douglas Jun 22 at 12:57

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