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I have a UserControl that has a ComboBox with binding to one of its own dependency Properties.

<UserControl x:Class="XamlParserComboBoxTest.ItemEditor" x:Name="aEditor">
    <Grid>
      <ComboBox Grid.Row="1"
                DisplayMemberPath="Name"
                ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Colors}"
                SelectedItem="{Binding ElementName=aEditor, 
                                       Path=Item.Color, 
                                       Mode=TwoWay}"/>

    </Grid>
</UserControl>

This DependencyProperty is filled with an instance of the Item Type:

public class Item : ViewModelBase
{
    private Color _color { get; set; }
    public Color Color
    {
        get { return _color; }
        set
        {
            _color = value;
            if (value == null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Color set to NULL");
            }
            Console.WriteLine(value);
            OnPropertyChanged("Color");
        }
    }
}

public class Color
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

When the UserControl is replaced with another UserControl, the Item's Color setter is called with NULL value. Properties bound to other controls don't experience any change.

While I have worked my way around this, I really need to understand what causes this and what's the best way to solve it.

EDIT: According to the stack trace, the null value comes from Item's base class, but I don't see how. Full source code available here. To reproduce the issue, start it up and press the "Show Item" button twice.

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What exactly do you mean by "When the UserControl is replaced with another UserControl"? and where is the ItemsSource coming from? –  HighCore Nov 15 '13 at 15:21
    
@HighCore, please check the source code. I only show one editor control in my window's center by binding a ContentControl's content to a property that's set by my ICommand implementation. –  Sebastian Edelmeier Nov 18 '13 at 9:13

2 Answers 2

You could try something like this using the TargetNullValue and possibly FallbackValue properties:

<ComboBox DisplayMemberPath="Name" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Colors}" 
    SelectedItem="{Binding ElementName=aEditor, Path=Item.Color, 
    TargetNullValue=Black, FallbackValue=Black, Mode=TwoWay}" />
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I know this only affects the ComboBox item side of the binding while he has the problem at the other side ... –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 15 '13 at 15:07
    
Ahhh, thanks for pointing that out. –  Sheridan Nov 15 '13 at 15:57

You can put a breakpoint where you have the message box and check the call stack. Then you will know who's setting the null.

Then probably you will be able to use a tool like 'JustDecompile' to find out why. If you are not used to that just post here the call stack and I'll do it for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, SoMoS. Could you explain how JustDecompile can help me? Given that name, I thought it was a decompiler... –  Sebastian Edelmeier Nov 18 '13 at 7:15
    
When you have the stack trace available then you will be able to know why the null is being set and then you know how to avoid it. –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 18 '13 at 7:19
    
I have uploaded the source code. Meanwhile I'd like to learn what you proposed, but don't know how to feed JustDecompile a stacktrace... –  Sebastian Edelmeier Nov 18 '13 at 7:51
    
Just do what I wrote on the answer. Put a breakpoint on the message box and go to visual studio -> debug -> windows -> callstack and tell me what's there. You won't feed the callstack to the decompiler, instead you will looks at what is .Net doing to put a null there. –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 18 '13 at 8:22

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