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I am trying to print out the contents of the objects that were added to the linked list. In this code my expected o/p is: 100 20 300 but I get: 300 300 300. Where I am going wrong?

import java.util.*; 
import java.lang.*; 
import java.io.*; 


class Body{ 
 int i; 
 public void setB(int i){ 
 this.i = i; 
 } 
} 
class Ideone 
{ 
  public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception 
  { 




  Body b = new Body(); 
  Body bdum; 

  LinkedList<Body> l = new LinkedList<Body>(); 

  b.setB(100); 
  l.add(b); 

  b.setB(20); 
  l.add(b); 

  b.setB(300); 
  l.add(b); 

  Iterator<Body> li = l.iterator(); 

  System.out.println(l.size()); 
  System.out.println("List is:"); 

  while(li.hasNext()){ 
  bdum = li.next(); 

  System.out.println(bdum.i); 
} 

} 
}
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1  
possible duplicate of ArrayList Issue –  Richard Tingle Nov 15 '13 at 17:18
    
a side note, also consider overriding equals method in the Body class, it is required when you compare between Body objects stored in the list. if you override equals override hashCode as well –  n1234 Nov 15 '13 at 17:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You create a single Body object and add it three times to the list. You should create three different objects instead. That is:

b.setB(100); 
l.add(b); 

b = new Body();
b.setB(20); 
l.add(b); 

b = new Body();
b.setB(300); 
l.add(b); 
share|improve this answer

The problem is here:

b.setB(100); 
l.add(b); 

b.setB(20); 
l.add(b); 

b.setB(300); 
l.add(b);

You're using the same object reference on the variable b. You should at least create a new object reference and assign the values, then add it to your list.

A possible solution may be:

b.setB(100); 
l.add(b);

b = new Body();
b.setB(20); 
l.add(b); 

b = new Body();
b.setB(300); 
l.add(b);

Another solution may be having a constructor in your class that will set the i field in your Body class:

class Body{ 
    int i; 
    //added for compatibility with current code
    public Body() {
    }
    public Body(int i) {
        setB(i);
    }
    public void setB(int i){ 
        this.i = i; 
    } 
}

Then in your class you just add a new instance of Body directly:

//b.setB(100); 
l.add(new Body(100));

//b.setB(20); 
l.add(new Body(200)); 

//b.setB(300); 
l.add(new Body(300));
share|improve this answer

In this code:

  Body b = new Body(); 
  Body bdum; 

  LinkedList<Body> l = new LinkedList<Body>(); 

  b.setB(100); 
  l.add(b); 

  b.setB(20); 
  l.add(b); 

  b.setB(300); 
  l.add(b);

You may think that you have added 3 items into LinkedList but actually there is only one item being added into List since you're re-using same object reference multiple times.

share|improve this answer

You are changing value on same instance of b. You need to create different instance and set values like:

   Body b1 = new Body(); 
   b1.setB(100); 
   l.add(b1); 

   Body b2 = new Body(); 
   b2.setB(20); 
   l.add(b2); 

   Body b3 = new Body(); 
   b3.setB(300); 
   l.add(b3); 
share|improve this answer

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