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I've written a small Windows Service that performs a task at a regular interval. It seems to be working fine, but I have a concern.

The OnStart method starts a "worker thread" that takes on the responsibility of performing the task, waiting for an interval to elapse, and repeating the task.

In the "Windows Services" section of "Administrative Tools", I can set it so that the service restarts automatically if it fails.

However, in the case that the worker thread throws exception, the service appears to continue running. I think that if the worker thread throws exception, the service should be considered stopped, and Windows should take the exception specified in the service settings.

What are the best practices for accomplishing this?

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Supposing that I want the service to stop when the worker thread dies, how can I do that? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Nov 15 '13 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In our case, we don't want a single task to crash the service (since maybe it was just bad data and all the other tasks will complete fine), so we just wrap all the worker logic in a try/catch and log any exception we hit. I do have some exception tracking code that will shut the service down if it's consistently failing though (e.g. network or database is down).

However, if your service only does a single task and it failing is good cause to stop everything, then I believe writing code to marshal the exception back to the main thread would work. You could save off SynchronizationContext.Current when you start the service, and use it to get back to the main thread when you encounter an exception. I believe that's stop (ehem, crash) the service. Pardon the code if it's not quite right. I don't have VS in front of me at the moment.

void OnStart()
{
  _mainThread = SynchronizationContext.Current();
}

void DoWork()
{
  try
  {
    // Do the stuff...
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
    _mainThread.Post(() => Throw);
  }
}

Edit:

On second thought, I think you could accomplish what you want like this... simple :)

void DoWork()
{
  try
  {
    // Do the stuff...
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
    LogException(e);
    this.Stop();
  }
}
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I don't have a lot of experience with multithreading. Can you explain how the SynchronizationContext works in this context? Also, I thought that the main thread exits after the worker thread is started, or am I mistaken? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Nov 15 '13 at 19:54
    
I haven't fully grokked it so I'm afraid I can't fully explain it to you, and I'm unsure about the threads as well. I'm kind of taking knowledge from the UI world and apply it to services. See edit for another (much simpler) idea. –  Jeff Bridgman Nov 15 '13 at 20:19

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