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I have xml like

 <categories>    
<category>
   <LOC>USA,UK,Spain  <LOC>
 </category>
    <category>
           <LOC>India,USA,China <LOC>
        </category>
          <categories>

I don't want to get the USA two times when I am displaying LOC

<xsl:value of select="$LOC/>

I was thinking of using some variable

<xsl:variable name="ABC" select="set:distinct(//LOC)"/>
<xsl:value-of select="$ABC"/>

But its not working Any idea what could be the problem

EDIT: sorry I edited my xml I typed it in wrong

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2  
I think your XML example is missing closing tags. Maybe this is just a syntax formatting issue. –  Jason Rowe Jan 4 '10 at 18:04
1  
Since the duplication exists between tokens in text() nodes, you can't easily do this with XSLT. If you are using XSLT2 you have access to parsing/tokenizing routines and could build a temporary tree of the individual tokens. In XSLT1 this would be possible, but much more difficult. –  Jim Garrison Jan 4 '10 at 18:04
    
what statement are you using to set the value of $LOC? –  Zack Jan 4 '10 at 18:04
1  
Downvoters, give the newbie a break please. We were all new here at one time, and the question is perfectly understandable and answerable in spite of the XML syntax errors. –  Jim Garrison Jan 4 '10 at 18:23
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The EXSLT function set:distinct operates on node sets. The strings you're passing to it are not node sets, and so this function isn't working. Or rather, it's working perfectly but you're expecting the unreasonable from it.

First of all, you should not be storing comma-separated lists in XML if you can help it. XML is already a delimited format so you should have absolutely no reason to store a delimited format inside of it.

If you have control over the format, you should be using something like this instead:

<categories>
  <category>
    <LOC>USA</LOC>
    <LOC>UK</LOC>
    <LOC>Spain</LOC>
  </category>
  <category>
    <LOC>India</LOC>
    <LOC>USA</LOC>
    <LOC>China</LOC>
  </category>
</categories>

If this were you input format, set:distinct would work just fine the way you're trying to use it.

If you don't have this control over the input format, you're going to find that XSLT really sucks at string manipulation and tokenization (XSLT 2 is more helpful if you have access to it, as Jim Garrison mentioned in a comment). Your best bet is to read the XML into some other structure and tokenize the LOC element's contents and work with the results directly than trying to do it in XSLT.

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Given this XML

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<categories>
    <category>
        <LOC>USA,UK,Spain  </LOC>
    </category>
    <category>
        <LOC>India,USA,China </LOC>
    </category>
</categories>

Here's an XSLT2 stylesheet that will do what you want

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" exclude-result-prefixes="xs" version="2.0">
    <xsl:variable name="LOC">
        <xsl:for-each select="//LOC/text()">
            <xsl:for-each select="tokenize(current(),',')">
                <temp><xsl:value-of select="current()"/></temp>
            </xsl:for-each>
        </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:value-of select="distinct-values($LOC/*)"/>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

It first builds a temporary tree (document fragment) containing one element for each token, then uses distinct-values() to remove duplicates. I coded and tested this in Oxygen/XML.

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Hi Jim thanks for replying . I m new to using xslt as you have guessed :-) .....could you tell me for using xslt 2.0 do I have to install something or just the stylesheet tag is enough as it is showing distinct-values function not found that means I am missing sth –  TSSS22 Jan 4 '10 at 19:36
    
You have to have an XSLT2 processor installed. There's a free version of Saxon (www.saxonica.com) that might be sufficient for your needs. If you're going to be doing some serious XSL studying and can afford it, I highly recommend getting an IDE that has an XSL debugger. My personal favorite is Oxygen/XML, and it comes with Saxon built-in. Other people like StylusStudio, and there are a couple of others. –  Jim Garrison Jan 4 '10 at 19:48

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