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In order to find the diameter of a tree I can take any node from the tree, perform BFS to find a node which is farthest away from it and then perform BFS on that node. The greatest distance from the second BFS will yield the diameter.

I am not sure how to prove this, though? I have tried using induction on the number of nodes, but there are too many cases.

Any ideas would be much appreciated...

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Can you tell me what you mean by too many cases? Theoretically all the sub cases should have be proved by induction as well. –  The Platypus Nov 15 '13 at 21:12
    
The crucial step is proving that the endpoint found from the first BFS, let's call it x, must be one of the endpoints of the longest path. Hint: Suppose (to the contrary) that there is a longer path between two vertices u and v, neither of which is x. On the unique path between u and v, there must be some highest (closest to the root) vertex h. There are two possibilities: either h is on the path from the root to x, or it is not. Show a contradiction by showing that in both cases, the u-v path can be made longer by replacing some path segment with a path to x. –  j_random_hacker Nov 15 '13 at 21:49
    
Errata: Change "can be made longer" in the above to "can be made at least as long". This handles the case where u or v (or both) are at the same depth as x. –  j_random_hacker Nov 15 '13 at 21:55
    
@j_random_hacker there must be some highest (closest to the root) vertex h -- a tree in general does not have a special node called root (there is e.g. root in BST -- binary search tree, but not in general) –  artur grzesiak Nov 15 '13 at 22:15
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By "root" he means "the root of the BFS". –  svinja Nov 15 '13 at 23:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Let's call the endpoint found by the first BFS x. The crucial step is proving that the x found in this first step always "works" -- that is, that it is always at one end of some longest path. (Note that in general there can be more than one equally-longest path.) If we can establish this, it's straightforward to see that a BFS rooted at x will find some node as far as possible from x, which must therefore be an overall longest path.

Hint: Suppose (to the contrary) that there is a longer path between two vertices u and v, neither of which is x.

Observe that, on the unique path between u and v, there must be some highest (closest to the root) vertex h. There are two possibilities: either h is on the path from the root of the BFS to x, or it is not. Show a contradiction by showing that in both cases, the u-v path can be made at least as long by replacing some path segment in it with a path to x.

[EDIT] Actually, it may not be necessary to treat the 2 cases separately after all. But I often find it easier to break a configuration into several (or even many) cases, and treat each one separately. Here, the case where h is on the path from the BFS root to x is easier to handle, and gives a clue for the other case.

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