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I want to create a ThreadPoolExecutor such that when it has reached its maximum size and the queue is full, the sumbit() method blocks when trying to add new tasks. Do I need to implement a custom RejectedExecutionHandler for that or is there an existing way to do this using standard java library?

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1  
Is what you want anything like the Array blocking queue's offer() method? –  extraneon Jan 4 '10 at 18:06
    
Yes, something like that. –  Fixpoint Jan 4 '10 at 18:07
    
    
@bacar I disagree. This Q&A looks more valuable (in addition to being older). –  JasonMArcher Sep 10 at 21:43

10 Answers 10

up vote 25 down vote accepted

One of the possible solutions I've just found:

public class BoundedExecutor {
    private final Executor exec;
    private final Semaphore semaphore;

    public BoundedExecutor(Executor exec, int bound) {
        this.exec = exec;
        this.semaphore = new Semaphore(bound);
    }

    public void submitTask(final Runnable command)
            throws InterruptedException, RejectedExecutionException {
        semaphore.acquire();
        try {
            exec.execute(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        command.run();
                    } finally {
                        semaphore.release();
                    }
                }
            });
        } catch (RejectedExecutionException e) {
            semaphore.release();
            throw e;
        }
    }
}

Are there any other solutions? I'd prefer something based on RejectedExecutionHandler since it seems like a standard way to handle such situations.

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When you catch RejectedExecutionException, should this not be re-thrown after the semaphore.release(); such that the caller still finds out about the problem? –  Timothy Pratley Jan 30 '10 at 6:37
    
Yes, I agree. Edited. –  Fixpoint Feb 1 '10 at 12:17
    
@Fixpoint I am using ThreadPoolExecutor with settings: core thread pool size - 2, max thread pool size - 10. Using BoundedExecutor, ThreadPoolExecutor exec is not spawning a new thread, when initial 2 threads are busy. When I don't use BoundedExecutor, it spawns new thread when 2 core pool threads are busy. –  Sanjeev Kumar Dangi Aug 29 '12 at 9:08
    
Is there a race condition here between the point when the semaphore is released in the finally clause and the semaphore is acquired? –  volni Dec 3 '12 at 23:28
    
@ArtemShnayder I think a task can release the semaphore and thus unblock an acquire() and allow a new task to be submitted just before the thread is put on the pool, causing a rejection. You meant that? –  user683887 Dec 6 '12 at 15:58

You can use ThreadPoolExecutor and a blockingQueue:

public class ImageManager {
    BlockingQueue<Runnable> blockingQueue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable>(blockQueueSize);
    RejectedExecutionHandler rejectedExecutionHandler = new ThreadPoolExecutor.CallerRunsPolicy();
    private ExecutorService executorService =  new ThreadPoolExecutor(numOfThread, numOfThread, 0L, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS, blockingQueue, rejectedExecutionHandler);

    private int downloadThumbnail(String fileListPath){
        executorService.submit(new yourRunnable());
    }
}
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I'd just like to say that this was an insanely quick and easy solution to implement that worked very well! –  Ivan Aug 8 '12 at 21:55
20  
This runs rejected tasks on the submitting thread. Which functionally does not meet the OP's requirements. –  Perception Dec 18 '12 at 3:36
    
How do you implement this with a callable?? –  lochi Sep 15 '13 at 14:45

Check out four alternatives for doing this: Creating a NotifyingBlockingThreadPoolExecutor

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You should use the CallerRunsPolicy, which executes the rejected task in the calling thread. This way, it can't submit any new tasks to the executor until that task is done, at which point there will be some free pool threads or the process will repeat.

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ThreadPoolExecutor.CallerRunsPolicy.html

From the docs:

Rejected tasks

New tasks submitted in method execute(java.lang.Runnable) will be rejected when the Executor has been shut down, and also when the Executor uses finite bounds for both maximum threads and work queue capacity, and is saturated. In either case, the execute method invokes the RejectedExecutionHandler.rejectedExecution(java.lang.Runnable, java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor) method of its RejectedExecutionHandler. Four predefined handler policies are provided:

  1. In the default ThreadPoolExecutor.AbortPolicy, the handler throws a runtime RejectedExecutionException upon rejection.
  2. In ThreadPoolExecutor.CallerRunsPolicy, the thread that invokes execute itself runs the task. This provides a simple feedback control mechanism that will slow down the rate that new tasks are submitted.
  3. In ThreadPoolExecutor.DiscardPolicy, a task that cannot be executed is simply dropped.
  4. In ThreadPoolExecutor.DiscardOldestPolicy, if the executor is not shut down, the task at the head of the work queue is dropped, and then execution is retried (which can fail again, causing this to be repeated.)

Also, make sure to use a bounded queue, such as ArrayBlockingQueue, when calling the ThreadPoolExecutor constructor. Otherwise, nothing will get rejected.

Edit: in response to your comment, set the size of the ArrayBlockingQueue to be equal to the max size of the thread pool and use the AbortPolicy.

Edit 2: Ok, I see what you're getting at. What about this: override the beforeExecute() method to check that getActiveCount() doesn't exceed getMaximumPoolSize(), and if it does, sleep and try again?

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2  
I want to have number of concurrently executed tasks to be strictly bounded (by the number of threads in Executor), this is why I can't allow caller threads to execute these tasks themselves. –  Fixpoint Jan 4 '10 at 18:11
    
AbortPolicy would cause caller thread to receive a RejectedExecutionException, while I need it to just block. –  Fixpoint Jan 4 '10 at 18:17
    
I'm asking for blocking, not sleep&polling ;) –  Fixpoint Jan 4 '10 at 18:37
    
@danben: Don't you mean CallerRunsPolicy? –  user359996 Aug 31 '11 at 23:36

The BoundedExecutor answer quoted above from Java Concurrency in Practice only works correctly if you use an unbounded queue for the Executor, or the semaphore bound is no greater than the queue size. The semaphore is state shared between the submitting thread and the threads in the pool, making it possible to saturate the executor even if queue size < bound <= (queue size + pool size).

Using CallerRunsPolicy is only valid if your tasks don't run forever, in which case your submitting thread will remain in rejectedExecution forever, and a bad idea if your tasks take a long time to run, because the submitting thread can't submit any new tasks or do anything else if it's running a task itself.

If that's not acceptable then I suggest checking the size of the executor's bounded queue before submitting a task. If the queue is full, then wait a short time before trying to submit again. The throughput will suffer, but I suggest it's a simpler solution than many of the other proposed solutions and you're guaranteed no tasks will get rejected.

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Hibernate has a BlockPolicy that is simple and may do what you want:

See: Executors.java

/**
 * A handler for rejected tasks that will have the caller block until
 * space is available.
 */
public static class BlockPolicy implements RejectedExecutionHandler {

    /**
     * Creates a <tt>BlockPolicy</tt>.
     */
    public BlockPolicy() { }

    /**
     * Puts the Runnable to the blocking queue, effectively blocking
     * the delegating thread until space is available.
     * @param r the runnable task requested to be executed
     * @param e the executor attempting to execute this task
     */
    public void rejectedExecution(Runnable r, ThreadPoolExecutor e) {
        try {
            e.getQueue().put( r );
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e1) {
            log.error( "Work discarded, thread was interrupted while waiting for space to schedule: {}", r );
        }
    }
}
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2  
On second thought, this is a pretty bad idea. I don't recommend you use it. For good reasons see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3446011/… –  Nate Murray Jan 4 '11 at 19:07
    
Also, this is not using the "standard Java library", as per the OP's request. Delete? –  user359996 Aug 31 '11 at 23:33

Create your own blocking queue to be used by the Executor, with the blocking behavior you are looking for, while always returning available remaining capacity (ensuring the executor will not try to create more threads than its core pool, or trigger the rejection handler).

I believe this will get you the blocking behavior you are looking for. A rejection handler will never fit the bill, since that indicates the executor can not perform the task. What I could envision there is that you get some form of 'busy waiting' in the handler. That is not what you want, you want a queue for the executor that blocks the caller...

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2  
ThreadPoolExecutor uses offer method to add tasks to queue. If I created a custom BlockingQueue that blocks on offer, that would break BlockingQueues contract. –  Fixpoint Jan 5 '10 at 8:08
    
@Shooshpanchick, that would break BlockingQueues contract. so what? if you are so keen you can explicitly enable the behavior during submit() only (it will take a ThreadLocal) –  bestsss Nov 28 '11 at 20:27
    
See also this answer to another question which spells out this alternative. –  Robert Tupelo-Schneck Mar 29 at 20:47

You should take a look at this link (notifying-blocking-thread-pool) which summarizes several solution and finally give an elegant one with notification.

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To avoid issues with @FixPoint solution. One could use ListeningExecutorService and release the semaphore onSuccess and onFailure inside FutureCallback.

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Recently I found this question having the same problem. The OP does not say so explicitly, but we do not want to use the RejectedExecutionHandler which executes a task on the submitter's thread, because this will under-utilize the worker threads if this task is a long running one.

Reading all the answers and comments, in particular the flawed solution with the semaphore or using afterExecute I had a closer look at the code of the ThreadPoolExecutor to see if there is some way out. I was amazed to see that there are more than 2000 lines of (commented) code, some of which make me feel dizzy. Given the rather simple requirement I actually have --- one producer, several consumers, let the producer block when no consumers can take work --- I decided to roll my own solution. It is not an ExecutorService but just an Executor. And it does not adapt the number of threads to the work load, but holds a fixed number of threads only, which also fits my requirements. Here is the code. Feel free to rant about it :-)

package x;

import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.Executor;
import java.util.concurrent.RejectedExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.SynchronousQueue;

/**
 * distributes {@code Runnable}s to a fixed number of threads. To keep the
 * code lean, this is not an {@code ExecutorService}. In particular there is
 * only very simple support to shut this executor down.
 */
public class ParallelExecutor implements Executor {
  // other bounded queues work as well and are useful to buffer peak loads
  private final BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue =
      new SynchronousQueue<Runnable>();
  private final Thread[] threads;

  /*+**********************************************************************/
  /**
   * creates the requested number of threads and starts them to wait for
   * incoming work
   */
  public ParallelExecutor(int numThreads) {
    this.threads = new Thread[numThreads];
    for(int i=0; i<numThreads; i++) {
      // could reuse the same Runner all over, but keep it simple
      Thread t = new Thread(new Runner());
      this.threads[i] = t;
      t.start();
    }
  }
  /*+**********************************************************************/
  /**
   * returns immediately without waiting for the task to be finished, but may
   * block if all worker threads are busy.
   * 
   * @throws RejectedExecutionException if we got interrupted while waiting
   *         for a free worker
   */
  @Override
  public void execute(Runnable task)  {
    try {
      workQueue.put(task);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
      throw new RejectedExecutionException("interrupt while waiting for a free "
          + "worker.", e);
    }
  }
  /*+**********************************************************************/
  /**
   * Interrupts all workers and joins them. Tasks susceptible to an interrupt
   * will preempt their work. Blocks until the last thread surrendered.
   */
  public void interruptAndJoinAll() throws InterruptedException {
    for(Thread t : threads) {
      t.interrupt();
    }
    for(Thread t : threads) {
      t.join();
    }
  }
  /*+**********************************************************************/
  private final class Runner implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
      while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) {
        Runnable task;
        try {
          task = workQueue.take();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
          // canonical handling despite exiting right away
          Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); 
          return;
        }
        try {
          task.run();
        } catch (RuntimeException e) {
          // production code to use a logging framework
          e.printStackTrace();
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
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