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I recently saw a PowerPoint on Smart Pointers and their pitfalls, which had this slide (with virtually no commentary or explanation:

In context: specifically the _com_ptr_t, Smart Pointer for COM-interfaces that handles AddRef/Release, as created by a _COM_SMARTPTR_TYPEDEF macro.*


Wrong:

IObjectPtr spObj;
for (int i(0); i<MAX; i++)
{
    //passed as actual , no release of previous ptr value
    spOtherObj->get_Obj(&spObj);
}

The next slide claims that it is okay if you put the spObj within the scope of the loop:


Right:

for (int i(0); i<MAX; i++)
{
    IObjectPtr spObj;
    //passed as actual , no release of previous ptr value
    spOtherObj->get_Obj(&spObj);
}

I've studied this, and still cannot figure out what they're talking about.
What is the problem with the first one that is solved by the second one??


I'm guessing that, in fuller context, the right/wrong code would look like:
although I could be wrong in my assumptions

_COM_SMARTPTR_TYPEDEF(ICalendar, __uuidof(ICalendar))

void get_Calendar(ICalendarPtr* pCalendar)
{
    *pCalendar.CreateInstance(__uuidof(Calendar));          
}

void WrongMethod(void)
{
    ICalendarPtr spCalendar;
    for (int i(0); i<MAX; i++)
    {
        //passed as actual , no release of previous ptr value
        get_Calendar(&spCalendar);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It also doesn't help that there's no context as to what get_Obj is doing. – Collin Dauphinee Nov 15 '13 at 21:45
    
pointers are always smart ;) – lordkain Nov 15 '13 at 21:46
1  
The context of this is all about the _com_ptr_t smart pointers to COM objects. – abelenky Nov 15 '13 at 21:46
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This most likely refers to ATL::CComPtr and not _com_ptr_t.

The problem is that CComPtr::operator& returns the address of the wrapped pointer but doesn't release it, therefore leaking the objects if it is declared out of the loop, assuming that the wrapped interface is not NULL.

The implementation acknowledges this fact, this is copied straight from ATL headers, including comments:

//The assert on operator& usually indicates a bug.  If this is really
//what is needed, however, take the address of the p member explicitly.
T** operator&() throw()
{
    ATLASSERT(p==NULL);
    return &p;
}

_com_ptr_t fixes this problem, and is more convenient to use in general, so it should be preferred were applicable.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good answer. And if you're right, no wonder I couldn't figure it out. I keep looking at _com_ptr_t, which doesn't have this problem! – abelenky Nov 15 '13 at 21:57
    
actually, I completely forgot about this problem with CComPtr until I saw your question :) – Zdeslav Vojkovic Nov 15 '13 at 21:58
    
I can't recall if CComPtr still supports it or to, but it used to have a debug-mode for detecting invocation of operator & that would throw an assert if fired on a non-null instance. Don't know if it still has it or not. – WhozCraig Nov 15 '13 at 21:59
    
Yes, it still has the check, I just looked it up in the source :) – Zdeslav Vojkovic Nov 15 '13 at 22:09

These are ATL::CComPtr smart pointers (which are marginally smart, btw).

The operator & for that object type returns the address of the raw interface pointer within. Therefore the first loop is literally no better than doing this:

IObject* pObj = NULL;
for (int i(0); i<MAX; i++)
{
    spOtherObj->get_Obj(&pObj);
}

With each iteration, the prior iteration's interface is never released. It is simply lost, leaked and the reference count on the underlying coclass will be artificially latched up.

By moving the smart pointer to the inside of the loop, you're now allowing the destructor of the smart-pointer object to clean up each interface acquired, firing ->Release(), before the next iteration. That code, expanded, is effectively this:

for (int i(0); i<MAX; i++)
{
    IObject* pObj = NULL;
    spOtherObj->get_Obj(&pObj);
    if (pObj) pObj->Release();
}
share|improve this answer

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