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please help me to plot the normal distribution of the folowing data:

DATA:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.stats import norm

h = [186, 176, 158, 180, 186, 168, 168, 164, 178, 170, 189, 195, 172,
     187, 180, 186, 185, 168, 179, 178, 183, 179, 170, 175, 186, 159,
     161, 178, 175, 185, 175, 162, 173, 172, 177, 175, 172, 177, 180]

std = np.std(h) 
mean = np.mean(h)    
plt.plot(norm.pdf(h,mean,std))

output:

Standard Deriviation = 8.54065575872 
mean = 176.076923077

the plot is incorrect, what is wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
    
you're defining your data as h, but feeding hs to the stat functions. is that the problem? –  Paul H Nov 15 '13 at 22:17
    
No I made a mistake in my typing, sorry, the problem is still unsolved –  Adel Memariani Nov 15 '13 at 22:19
6  
As it stands now, people can't copy and paste your code into a console and run it (your list isn't defined properly). i recommend fixing that. Also please edit your question to include the values that you expect to see and exactly where it is failing. Is the plot incorrect? Is the mean incorrect? The standard deviation? Everything? Last question: where did norm come from? These are thing potential answerers need to know –  Paul H Nov 15 '13 at 22:21
3  
@user108864 I've tried to edit your code so that it actually runs when (as Paul H says) I copy and paste it into a console. That means things like import statements and commas when defining your array so the syntax is correct. It's really important that you give code that does this because otherwise there is a lot of guesswork involved in answering your question and people either don't give answers or their answers are less likely to be useful to you. I could have mis-interpreted when making the edits though so please check and edit again if needed or add any other necessary parts. –  YXD Nov 15 '13 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

You may try using hist to put your data info along with the fitted curve as below:

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as stats
import pylab as pl

h = sorted([186, 176, 158, 180, 186, 168, 168, 164, 178, 170, 189, 195, 172,
     187, 180, 186, 185, 168, 179, 178, 183, 179, 170, 175, 186, 159,
     161, 178, 175, 185, 175, 162, 173, 172, 177, 175, 172, 177, 180])  #sorted

fit = stats.norm.pdf(h, np.mean(h), np.std(h))  #this is a fitting indeed

pl.plot(h,fit,'-o')

pl.hist(h,normed=True)      #use this to draw histogram of your data

pl.show()                   #use may also need add this 

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Assuming you're getting norm from scipy.stats, you probably just need to sort your list:

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as stats
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

h = [186, 176, 158, 180, 186, 168, 168, 164, 178, 170, 189, 195, 172,
     187, 180, 186, 185, 168, 179, 178, 183, 179, 170, 175, 186, 159,
     161, 178, 175, 185, 175, 162, 173, 172, 177, 175, 172, 177, 180]
h.sort()
hmean = np.mean(h)
hstd = np.std(h)
pdf = stats.norm.pdf(h, hmean, hstd)
plt.plot(h, pdf) # including h here is crucial

And so I get: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much, but how about showing the DATA with that? –  Adel Memariani Nov 15 '13 at 22:47
    
@user108864 it is meaningless to directly plot the actual values of the data array alongside this. This plot shows the pdf evaluated on the data points. You can plot a smooth (looking) probability density function evaluated on a dense set of points, you can plot the probability density function evaluated on your input data (as in this answer) and you can plot a histogram (as I wrote in your previous question). What's your overall goal? –  YXD Nov 15 '13 at 22:59
    
@user108864 See our answer. You may like it ;) –  Developer Nov 17 '13 at 2:25

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