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I have made an object called Transaction which I am passing in an ArrayQueue.

Here is the Transaction class constructors (I have the appropriate setter and getters too):

public class Transaction {

    private int shares;
    private int price;

    public Transaction(int shares, int price) {
       this.shares = shares;
       this.price = price;
    }

    public Transaction(Object obj) {
       shares = obj.getShares();
       price = obj.getPrice();
    }
}

In the second constructor there I am wanting a scenario where I can pass into it a different Transaction object that has been dequeue(ed) and get the info from that transaction and make it into a new transaction or possibly manipulate it before I put it back into the queue. But when I compile it does not like this.

Is this acceptable programming practice to pass a specific object into it's own object's constructor? Or is this even possible?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to specify the same type:

public Transaction(Transaction obj) {
       shares = obj.getShares();
       price = obj.getPrice();
    }

Provided that you have defined getShares() and getPrice().

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Why wont type casting work ? That way we can even pass a parameter of Object type. –  Ankit Rustagi Nov 15 '13 at 22:39
    
I just tried both and they both work for my client program. Thank you! –  Maggie B. Nov 15 '13 at 22:43
    
@AnkitRustagi I think I will do the type casting version, for that point exactly. Thank you again. –  Maggie B. Nov 15 '13 at 22:44
    
Mark my answer as accepted if it helped. :) –  Ankit Rustagi Nov 15 '13 at 22:45
    
When you use Object and cast it will be possible to use something which cannot be cast by accident - your program will fail at runtime. If you'll explicitly say Transaction the compiler will tell you that you do something wrong BEFORE you actually execute the code, thus saving your time. –  Secator Nov 15 '13 at 22:46

Yes this is entirely possible.

public Transaction(Transaction other){
    shares = other.shares;
    price = other.price;
}

You do not need to call their getters because privacy only applies to other classes.

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It's called copy-constructor and you should use public Transaction(Transaction obj) instead of Object and also provide getters:

public class Transaction {

    private int shares;
    private int price;

    public Transaction(int shares, int price) {
       this.shares = shares;
       this.price = price;
    }

    public Transaction(Transaction obj) {
       this(obj.getShares(), obj.getPrice()); // Call the constructor above with values from given Transaction
    }

    public int getShares(){
        return shares;
    }

    public int getPrice(){
        return price;
    }
}
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Yes, you can do that but you will have to type cast the parameter

public Transaction(Object obj) {
   Transaction myObj = (Transaction) obj; 
   shares = MyObj.getShares();
   price = MyObj.getPrice();
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no benefit of using Object and than casting to Transaction as it will anyway work only with Transaction as argument and throw ClassCastException for all other types. Java is strongly typed - let's use it! –  Secator Nov 15 '13 at 22:39
    
Yes, agreed, but i was just trying to point out that the OP can even pass a parameter of Object type. –  Ankit Rustagi Nov 15 '13 at 22:40

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