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I have this config file

dbUser=customer
dbPass=passwrd
dbSid=customer.shadow
passwdFile=/production/etc-user
tmpUsers=tmpuser
htpasswd=/usr/local/apache2/bin/htpasswd

and then a script that reads in the config file:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

readConfig();
# reads in a config file
sub readConfig {
  my $configFile = $ARGV[0];
  my %prefs ="" ;
  open (CONFIG, "< $configFile") or die "Cannot open $configFile for reading: $!\n";
  while (<CONFIG>) {
    chomp;    # kill newlines
    s/#.*//;  # ignore comments
    s/^\s+//; # ignore leading whitespace
    s/\s+$//; # ignore trailing whitespace
    next unless length;
    my($var,$value) = split(/\s*=\s*/, $_, 2);
    $prefs{$var} = $value;
        print "$var : $prefs{$var}\n";
        }
   }

I get an odd error - odd number of elements in hash assignemnt:

bash-3.00$   /tmp/config_foo  /production/cfg/users.cfg
Odd number of elements in hash assignment at /tmp/config_foo line 10.
dbUser : customer
dbPass : passwd
dbSid : customer.shadow
passwdFile : /production/etc-users1
tmpUsers : tmpuser
htpasswd : /usr/local/apache2/bin/htpasswd
bash-3.00$
bash-3.00$
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3 Answers 3

my %prefs = "";

is the line that's causing the error. A hash should be initialized with a list that has an even number of elements. You could write

my %prefs = ();

but there's no reason to, since

my %prefs;

does the same thing.

share|improve this answer

Just use my %prefs;

When you say:

my %prefs ="" ;

You are creating a hash with this structure.

$VAR1 = {
          '' => undef
        };

Here's a little demo using your code from your subroutine:

use warnings;                                              
use strict;        

my %prefs;    

while (<DATA>) {                                                                
    chomp;    # kill newlines                                                   
    s/#.*//;  # ignore comments                                                 
    s/^\s+//; # ignore leading whitespace                                   
    s/\s+$//; # ignore trailing whitespace                                      
    next unless length;                                                         
    my($var,$value) = split(/\s*=\s*/, $_, 2);                                  
    $prefs{$var} = $value;                                                      
    print "$var : $prefs{$var}\n";                                              
}                                                                               


__DATA__                                                                        
dbUser=customer                                                                 
dbPass=passwrd                                                                  
dbSid=customer.shadow                                                           
passwdFile=/production/etc-user                                                 
tmpUsers=tmpuser                                                                
htpasswd=/usr/local/apache2/bin/htpasswd  

And it outputs

dbUser : customer
dbPass : passwrd
dbSid : customer.shadow
passwdFile : /production/etc-user
tmpUsers : tmpuser
htpasswd : /usr/local/apache2/bin/htpasswd
share|improve this answer

Use () when assigning an empty hash.

So, just change this line:

my %prefs ="" ;

To this:

my %prefs = ();
share|improve this answer

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