Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose that I have two classes A and B and I want to make it so that instances of B can only be created in A and in B itself. I don't want any other class (including subclasses of A) to be allowed to create instances of B. Is there any way of doing this in Java?

Here is a bit of code if it's not clear what I am trying to do:

public class A {
    B instance;
    public A(){
        // Still allows for subclasses to access B
        instance = B.getInstance((Object)this);
    }
}

Here is the class whose construction I want to limit:

public class B {

    // If I make this public all classes can create it, but
    // if I make it private without any getter methods then
    // no other classes but itself can create it
    private B(){}

    // Problem with this is that subclasses of  A
    // can also create instances of B
    public static B getInstance(Object o){
        if(o instanceof A)
            return new B();
        else
            return null;
    } 
}

I have tried Googling and searching on StackOverflow for possible solutions, but the closest thing that I have found is using a Singleton design pattern with a modified getInstance() method to make sure only a class with a particular type can have access to instances of class B. While this works fairly well, it still enables any subclass which extends A to get instances of B. Is there any way to stop this from occurring or would it ruin the whole point of subclassing if a subclass couldn't do what its superclass could do?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Suppose that I have two classes A and B and I want to make it so that instances of B can only be created in A and in B itself. I don't want any other class (including subclasses of A) to be allowed to create instances of B.

You could make B a private inner class of the A class.

share|improve this answer

While this works fairly well, it still enables any subclass which extends A to get instances of B. Is there any way to stop this from occurring or would it ruin the whole point of subclassing if a subclass couldn't do what its superclass could do?

If you don't want your class A to be subclassed, you can make class A final, or can have a private constructor for A. Although as suggested in previous answers,, its better to create private inner classes.

public final class A {
    B instance;
    public A(){
        // Still allows for subclasses to access B
        instance = B.getInstance((Object)this);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
While the other answer is slightly better, for my particular application I actually didn't need subclasses of A to be created in the first place so this was useful. Plus it might help if I want to move a lengthy private inner class into its own separate source file for readability purposes. Therefore +1. –  DiscoChinchilla Nov 16 '13 at 2:12

This class will throw an exception if creating class is not B

class A {

    A() {
        new SecurityManager() {
            {
                if (getClassContext()[1] != B.class) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException();
                }
            }
        };
    }
...

you cannot break it even with reflection

share|improve this answer
    
This works albeit I think the condition would have to be getClassContext()[2] != B.class because getClassContext()[1] gives you A.class and getClassContext()[0] gives you the SecurityManager class. –  DiscoChinchilla Nov 16 '13 at 2:19

A can present something to B that only A can possess. For example

public class A
{
    public static class Pass
    {
        private Pass(){}

Only A can create an A.Pass object. If such objects are only transmitted from A to B, nobody else can get a hold of them and pretend to be A.

public class B
{
    public static B getInstance(A.Pass token)
    {
        if(pass==null) 
            throw ...      
        else
            caller must be A
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.