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Part of a website's JSON response had this (... added for context):

{..., now:function(){return(new Date).getTime()}, ...}

Is adding anonymous functions to JSON valid? I would expect each time you access 'time' to return a different value.

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Did the JSON parse successfully by the browser? If so then yes it is valid (in that respect). –  harschware Jan 4 '10 at 19:36
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@harschware - that is true only as JSON relates to javascript. As a language independent data serialization format it is false and is a problematic road to walk down. –  jsoverson Jan 4 '10 at 19:40
    
@jsoverson - I agree. See my answer below. –  harschware Jan 4 '10 at 19:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 47 down vote accepted

JSON is purely meant to be a data description language. Per http://www.json.org, it is a "lightweight data-interchange format." - not a programming language.

Per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JSON, the "basic types" supported are:

  • Number (integer, real, or floating point)
  • String (double-quoted Unicode with backslash escaping)
  • Boolean (true and false)
  • Array (an ordered sequence of values, comma-separated and enclosed in square brackets)
  • Object (collection of key:value pairs, comma-separated and enclosed in curly braces)
  • null
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Is [], {} equal to null? I know nothing is comparable to null, including null, but is an empty set evaluated as a null value? –  Dr. Zim Oct 30 '10 at 21:06
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@Dr. Zim, no and to compare things to null what i do is this a==null?1:a.toString()=="" What this does is it says if a=null then it returns 1/true, if it is "" meaning empty string you also get 1/true.. if it is not null or "" then it will return 0/false, you can replicate this more to work with [] and {} simply just be adding ?1:a==[]?1:a.toString()=={}.toString(); to my prev snippet. so maybe this function will help you. isnull=(function(a){return (a==null?1:a.toString()==""?1:a==[]?1:a.toString()=={}.toString())?true:false}) I would use ?1:0 instead of ?true:false but (true/false) –  JamesM-SiteGen Jan 4 '11 at 6:05
    
is correct for the javascript function standard –  JamesM-SiteGen Jan 4 '11 at 6:05
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At the same time, functions are data too. –  jeromeyers Mar 1 '12 at 18:55
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I landed here while finding a way to fetch "further data" using JSON. It would be nice to inform a client (from the server) how to get further data, without the client worrying about which REST or so api to call next. –  Ravindranath Akila Jun 24 at 7:48

The problem is that JSON as a data definition language evolved out of JSON as a JavaScript Object Notation. Since Javascript supports eval on JSON, it is legitimate to put JSON code inside JSON (in that use-case). If you're using JSON to pass data remotely, then I would say it is bad practice to put methods in the JSON because you may not have modeled your client-server interaction well. And, further, when wishing to use JSON as a data description language I would say you could get yourself into trouble by embedding methods because some JSON parsers were written with only data description in mind and may not support method definitions in the structure.

Wikipedia JSON entry makes a good case for not including methods in JSON, citing security concerns:

Unless you absolutely trust the source of the text, and you have a need to parse and accept text that is not strictly JSON compliant, you should avoid eval() and use JSON.parse() or another JSON specific parser instead. A JSON parser will recognize only JSON text and will reject other text, which could contain malevolent JavaScript. In browsers that provide native JSON support, JSON parsers are also much faster than eval. It is expected that native JSON support will be included in the next ECMAScript standard.

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It is not standard as far as I know. A quick look at http://json.org/ confirms this.

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JSON explicitly excludes functions because it isn't meant to be a JavaScript-only data structure (despite the JS in the name).

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Nope, definitely not.

If you use a decent JSON serializer, it won't let you serialize a function like that. It's a valid OBJECT, but not valid JSON. Whatever that website's intent, it's not sending valid JSON.

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I use JSON-Lib and consider it to be a great serializer. From the [usage page](json-lib.sourceforge.net/usage.html) you can see it will serialize functions just fine –  harschware Jan 4 '10 at 21:54
    
Interesting...I've never seen that before. It's definitely not to spec (json.org explicitly states that JSON is language independent, which function definitions are not), but interesting nonetheless. –  jvenema Jan 5 '10 at 2:30
    
It's funny that it's supposed to be language independent but JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation hmm weird.. –  Nate Oct 18 '13 at 15:15

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