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I have a form that it has some field and has relationship with database. I'm using entity framework I wanna handle exception before sql server send error message. For example when user enter string value in number field win or web application handle exception before sql server handle it. I wrote this code but it don't work for all the exception. For example if field was empty or has invalid type said input string is not in correct format.

 using (var context  = new entityTestEntities2())
        {
            try
            {
                int stNumber = Convert.ToInt32(textBox2.Text);
                var allCustomers = context.setcust(null, stNumber);
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.Message.Contains("correct format"))
                { 
                int x= System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetExceptionCode();
                     MessageBox.Show("error number"+x.ToString()+ex.Message);
                }
             }
        } 
share|improve this question
    
I recommend Integer.TryParse for input from textboxes. –  OneFineDay Nov 16 '13 at 5:23
    
my question is general its only an example (int or empty field) –  heavy Nov 16 '13 at 5:36
1  
What does the UI look like? We're using MVC3 a lot lately, we'll build out datamodels with attributes and/or use the unobtrusive javascript validation. I'd think you'd want to do validation closer to the UI instead of letting it make a call to the database, especially in a web environment. –  Jake Hargus Nov 16 '13 at 5:59
    
i do it with java script in web app but i want to produce core and place exception handle in core.i wanna find a solution for it –  heavy Nov 16 '13 at 6:08
    
noONe can help me?\ –  heavy Nov 17 '13 at 6:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you should do is finding a architecture which is fits your solution model. In general I would do validation before creating the context. If you need more validation in your application you may want to create a validation layer for this purpose.

public class RuleViolation
{
    public string Property {get; set;}
    public string Message {get; set;}
}

public class Program
{
    public static List<RuleViolation> GetRuleViolations(string[] parameters)
    {
        List<RuleViolation> validations = new List<RuleViolation>();

        if(!int.TryParse(parameters[0], out new Int32()))
        {
            validations.Add(new RuleViolation{Message ="Input1 must be integer.", Property = "input1"});
        }
        //more validation

        return validations;
    }

    public static void Main(string[] parameters)
    {
        var validations = GetRuleViolations(parameters);

        if(validations.Any())
        {
            validations.ForEach(x=> Console.WriteLine(x.Message));
            return;
        }

        int input1 = int.Parse(parameters[0]);

        //after all your business logic are ok, then you can go to persistence layer to hit the database.
        using (var context  = new entityTestEntities2())
        {
            try
            {
                var allCustomers = context.setcust(null, input1);
            }
            catch(SqlException exc)
            {
                //here you might still get some exceptions but not about validation.

                ExceptionManager.Log(exc);

                //sometimes you may want to throw the exception to upper layers for handle it better over there!
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}

Hope the example make more clearer the architecture about validation logic.

share|improve this answer

Instead of catching Exception you should catch SqlException.

SqlException has a number property that you can use:

catch (SqlException e)
{
   MessageBox.Show("Error number: "+e.Number + " - " + e.Message);
}
share|improve this answer

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