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I am currently writing a little bootstrap code for a service that can be run in the console. It essentially boils down to calling the OnStart() method instead of using the ServiceBase to start and stop the service (because it doesn't run the application if it isn't installed as a service and makes debugging a nightmare).

Right now I am using Debugger.IsAttached to determine if I should use ServiceBase.Run or [service].OnStart, but I know that isn't the best idea because some times end users want to run the service in a console (to see the output etc. realtime).

Any ideas on how I could determine if the Windows service controller started 'me', or if the user started 'me' in the console? Apparantly Environment.IsUserInteractive is not the answer. I thought about using commandline args, but that seems 'dirty'.

I could always see about a try-catch statement around ServiceBase.Run, but that seems dirty. Edit: Try catch doesn't work.

I have a solution: putting it up here for all the other interested stackers:

    public void Run()
    {
        if (Debugger.IsAttached || Environment.GetCommandLineArgs().Contains<string>("-console"))
        {
            RunAllServices();
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                string temp = Console.Title;
                ServiceBase.Run((ServiceBase[])ComponentsToRun);
            }
            catch
            {
                RunAllServices();
            }
        }
    } // void Run

    private void RunAllServices()
    {
        foreach (ConsoleService component in ComponentsToRun)
        {
            component.Start();
        }
        WaitForCTRLC();
        foreach (ConsoleService component in ComponentsToRun)
        {
            component.Stop();
        }
    }

EDIT: There was another question on StackOverflow where the guy had problems with the Environment.CurrentDirectory being "C:\Windows\System32" looks like that may be the answer. I will test today.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks dor adding your solution, should be a useful reference. –  Ash Oct 16 '08 at 9:57
1  
Not that IsUserInteractive will not return false for console applications, as it was indicated in the link you provide above - at least not in general. I'm using it for that purpose and never had any issues with it. –  Christian.K Mar 6 '10 at 9:22

10 Answers 10

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Like Ash, I write all actual processing code in a separate class library assembly, which was then referenced by the windows service executable, as well as a console app.

However, there are occasions when it is useful to know if the class library is running in the context of the service executable or the console app. The way I do this is to reflect on the base class of the hosting app. (Sorry for the VB, but I imagine that the following could be c#-ified fairly easily):

Public Class ExecutionContext
    ''' <summary>
    ''' Gets a value indicating whether the application is a windows service.
    ''' </summary>
    ''' <value>
    ''' <c>true</c> if this instance is service; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    ''' </value>
    Public Shared ReadOnly Property IsService() As Boolean
        Get
            ' Determining whether or not the host application is a service is
            ' an expensive operation (it uses reflection), so we cache the
            ' result of the first call to this method so that we don't have to
            ' recalculate it every call.

            ' If we have not already determined whether or not the application
            ' is running as a service...
            If IsNothing(_isService) Then

                ' Get details of the host assembly.
                Dim entryAssembly As Reflection.Assembly = Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly

                ' Get the method that was called to enter the host assembly.
                Dim entryPoint As System.Reflection.MethodInfo = entryAssembly.EntryPoint

                ' If the base type of the host assembly inherits from the
                ' "ServiceBase" class, it must be a windows service. We store
                ' the result ready for the next caller of this method.
                _isService = (entryPoint.ReflectedType.BaseType.FullName = "System.ServiceProcess.ServiceBase")

            End If

            ' Return the cached result.
            Return CBool(_isService)
        End Get
    End Property

    Private Shared _isService As Nullable(Of Boolean) = Nothing
#End Region
End Class
share|improve this answer
1  
That's it! Fantastic! –  Jonathan C Dickinson Oct 22 '08 at 5:11
2  
I don't see how this could work if the same assembly could be run as a console app or as a Windows service...Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() and Assembly.EntryPoint return the same values in both cases. I'd guess it only works if you run different assemblies in the two cases. –  Dan Ports Dec 19 '11 at 17:08
    
@DanPorts: I've never attempted to run the same assembly as both a console app and as a Windows Service. However, it is sometimes useful to compile the same set of classes into an app of each kind, in which case the class above can be useful to determine which context it is being used in. –  Kramii Dec 19 '11 at 20:33

I usually flag by Windows service as a console application which takes a command line parameter of "-console" to run as a console, otherwise it runs as a service. To debug you just set the command line paramters in the project options to "-console" and you're off!

This makes debugging nice and easy and means that the app functions as a service by default, which is what you'll want.

share|improve this answer
2  
That is exactly how I do it, too. Works very well; the only gotcha with debugging then is the security (which account) and the working folder - which are easier to code around. –  Marc Gravell Oct 14 '08 at 6:43

What works for me:

  • The class doing the actual service work is running in a separate thread.
  • This thread is started from within the OnStart() method, and stopped from OnStop().
  • The decision between service and console mode depends on Environment.UserInteractive

Sample code:

class MyService : ServiceBase
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        if (Environment.UserInteractive)
        {
            startWorkerThread();
            Console.WriteLine ("======  Press ENTER to stop threads  ======");
            Console.ReadLine();
            stopWorkerThread() ;
            Console.WriteLine ("======  Press ENTER to quit  ======");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
        else
        {
            Run (this) ;
        }
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        startWorkerThread();
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        stopWorkerThread() ;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip gyrolf, but unfortunately Environment.UserInteractive is only true for Windows Forms applications :(. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Oct 17 '08 at 5:29
4  
As I understand the documentation and the sample code in it, there is no restriction to Windows Forms applications. I use it successfully in normal console applications. –  gyrolf Oct 17 '08 at 8:38
3  
I can confirm that this is correct. Environment.UserInteractive is True when running a console, and False if running as a service. –  voithos Dec 21 '11 at 19:18

Jonathan, not exactly an answer to your question, but I've just finished writing a windows service and also noted the difficulty with debugging and testing.

Solved it by simply writing all actual processing code in a separate class library assembly, which was then referenced by the windows service executable, as well as a console app and a test harness.

Apart from basic timer logic, all more complex processing happened in the common assembly and could be tested/run on demand incredibly easily.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very helpful information, I guess that is the 'proper' way to do it. I wish you could accept two answers :). –  Jonathan C Dickinson Oct 14 '08 at 6:52
    
No problems Jonathan, glad it was useful. These days I try to follow this approach (separate application logic assembly) for all applications. That way a Windows Service can be seen as just another type of view into the application. I guess this is the Model View Controller pattern. –  Ash Oct 15 '08 at 3:07

Another workaround.. so can run as WinForm or as windows service

var backend = new Backend();

if (Environment.UserInteractive)
{
     backend.OnStart();
     Application.EnableVisualStyles();
     Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
     Application.Run(new Fronend(backend));
     backend.OnStop();
}
else
{
     var ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] {backend};
     ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I like this solution, it seems it is what Environment.UserInteractive was designed for. –  Josh M. Nov 30 '11 at 17:25
    
I wonder what would happen if you have checked the "Allow service to interact with desktop" for that service. From what I know that would allow the service to have a GUI. Shouldn't the UserInteractive property return true then? [MSDN:The UserInteractive property reports false for a Windows process or a service like IIS that runs without a user interface.] –  Mircea Ion Aug 29 '13 at 13:42
    
I have tested: When you check "Allow service to interact with desktop" then UserInteractive is true. –  csname1910 Aug 13 at 0:10

I have modified the ProjectInstaller to append the command-line argument parameter /service, when it is being installed as service:

static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (Array.Exists(args, delegate(string arg) { return arg == "/install"; }))
        {
            System.Configuration.Install.TransactedInstaller ti = null;
            ti = new System.Configuration.Install.TransactedInstaller();
            ti.Installers.Add(new ProjectInstaller());
            ti.Context = new System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext("", null);
            string path = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;
            ti.Context.Parameters["assemblypath"] = path;
            ti.Install(new System.Collections.Hashtable());
            return;
        }

        if (Array.Exists(args, delegate(string arg) { return arg == "/uninstall"; }))
        {
            System.Configuration.Install.TransactedInstaller ti = null;
            ti = new System.Configuration.Install.TransactedInstaller();
            ti.Installers.Add(new ProjectInstaller());
            ti.Context = new System.Configuration.Install.InstallContext("", null);
            string path = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;
            ti.Context.Parameters["assemblypath"] = path;
            ti.Uninstall(null);
            return;
        }

        if (Array.Exists(args, delegate(string arg) { return arg == "/service"; }))
        {
            ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;

            ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] { new MyService() };
            ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The ProjectInstaller.cs is then modified to override a OnBeforeInstall() and OnBeforeUninstall()

[RunInstaller(true)]
public partial class ProjectInstaller : Installer
{
    public ProjectInstaller()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    protected virtual string AppendPathParameter(string path, string parameter)
    {
        if (path.Length > 0 && path[0] != '"')
        {
            path = "\"" + path + "\"";
        }
        path += " " + parameter;
        return path;
    }

    protected override void OnBeforeInstall(System.Collections.IDictionary savedState)
    {
        Context.Parameters["assemblypath"] = AppendPathParameter(Context.Parameters["assemblypath"], "/service");
        base.OnBeforeInstall(savedState);
    }

    protected override void OnBeforeUninstall(System.Collections.IDictionary savedState)
    {
        Context.Parameters["assemblypath"] = AppendPathParameter(Context.Parameters["assemblypath"], "/service");
        base.OnBeforeUninstall(savedState);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Above example is not handling quotes properly, check this for better solution stackoverflow.com/questions/4862580/… –  Palani Jan 22 '12 at 14:54
    
Improved handling of quotes around path –  Rolf Kristensen Nov 28 '13 at 13:36

This thread is really old, but I thought I would throw my solution out there. Quite simply, to handle this type of situation, I built a "service harness" that is used in both the console and Windows service cases. As above, most of the logic is contained in a separate library, but this is more for testing and "linkability".

The attached code by no means represents the "best possible" way to solve this, just my own approach. Here, the service harness is called by the console app when in "console mode" and by the same application's "start service" logic when it is running as a service. By doing it this way, you can now call

ServiceHost.Instance.RunningAsAService (Boolean)

from anywhere in your code to check if the application is running as a service or simply as a console.

Here is the code:

public class ServiceHost
{
    private static Logger log = LogManager.GetLogger(typeof(ServiceHost).Name);

    private static ServiceHost mInstance = null;
    private static object mSyncRoot = new object();

    #region Singleton and Static Properties

    public static ServiceHost Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (mInstance == null)
            {
                lock (mSyncRoot)
                {
                    if (mInstance == null)
                    {
                        mInstance = new ServiceHost();
                    }
                }
            }

            return (mInstance);
        }
    }

    public static Logger Log
    {
        get { return log; }
    }

    public static void Close()
    {
        lock (mSyncRoot)
        {
            if (mInstance.mEngine != null)
                mInstance.mEngine.Dispose();
        }
    }

    #endregion

    private ReconciliationEngine mEngine;
    private ServiceBase windowsServiceHost;
    private UnhandledExceptionEventHandler threadExceptionHanlder = new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(ThreadExceptionHandler);

    public bool HostHealthy { get; private set; }
    public bool RunningAsService {get; private set;}

    private ServiceHost()
    {
        HostHealthy = false;
        RunningAsService = false;
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += threadExceptionHandler;

        try
        {
            mEngine = new ReconciliationEngine();
            HostHealthy = true;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log.FatalException("Could not initialize components.", ex);
        }
    }

    public void StartService()
    {
        if (!HostHealthy)
            throw new ApplicationException("Did not initialize components.");

        try
        {
            mEngine.Start();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log.FatalException("Could not start service components.", ex);
            HostHealthy = false;
        }
    }

    public void StartService(ServiceBase serviceHost)
    {
        if (!HostHealthy)
            throw new ApplicationException("Did not initialize components.");

        if (serviceHost == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("serviceHost");

        windowsServiceHost = serviceHost;
        RunningAsService = true;

        try
        {
            mEngine.Start();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log.FatalException("Could not start service components.", ex);
            HostHealthy = false;
        }
    }

    public void RestartService()
    {
        if (!HostHealthy)
            throw new ApplicationException("Did not initialize components.");         

        try
        {
            log.Info("Stopping service components...");
            mEngine.Stop();
            mEngine.Dispose();

            log.Info("Starting service components...");
            mEngine = new ReconciliationEngine();
            mEngine.Start();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log.FatalException("Could not restart components.", ex);
            HostHealthy = false;
        }
    }

    public void StopService()
    {
        try
        {
            if (mEngine != null)
                mEngine.Stop();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log.FatalException("Error stopping components.", ex);
            HostHealthy = false;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (windowsServiceHost != null)
                windowsServiceHost.Stop();

            if (RunningAsService)
            {
                AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException -= threadExceptionHanlder;
            }
        }
    }

    private void HandleExceptionBasedOnExecution(object ex)
    {
        if (RunningAsService)
        {
            windowsServiceHost.Stop();
        }
        else
        {
            throw (Exception)ex;
        }
    }

    protected static void ThreadExceptionHandler(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        log.FatalException("Unexpected error occurred. System is shutting down.", (Exception)e.ExceptionObject);
        ServiceHost.Instance.HandleExceptionBasedOnExecution((Exception)e.ExceptionObject);
    }
}

All you need to do here is replace that ominous looking ReconcilationEngine reference with whatever method is boostrapping your logic. Then in your application, use the ServiceHost.Instance.Start() and ServiceHost.Instance.Stop() methods whether you are running in console mode or as a service.

share|improve this answer

The only way I've found to achieve this, is to check if a console is attached to the process in the first place, by accessing any Console object property (e.g. Title) inside a try/catch block.

If the service is started by the SCM, there is no console, and accessing the property will throw a System.IO.IOError.

However, since this feels a bit too much like relying on an implementation-specific detail (what if the SCM on some platforms or someday decides to provide a console to the processes it starts?), I always use a command line switch (-console) in production apps...

share|improve this answer

Maybe checking if the process parent is C:\Windows\system32\services.exe.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I will try and see if that works... –  Jonathan C Dickinson Dec 27 '08 at 11:38

This is a bit of a self-plug, but I've got a little app that will load up your service types in your app via reflection and execute them that way. I include the source code, so you could change it slightly to display standard output.

No code changes needed to use this solution. I have a Debugger.IsAttached type of solution as well that is generic enough to be used with any service. Link is in this article: .NET Windows Service Runner

share|improve this answer
    
I actually wrote a base class for them that has as Start() method, this way I don't have to resort to reflection. Thanks for the tip though. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Oct 14 '08 at 7:02
    
This is designed to be a standalone way to run any service outside of the windows services environment without changing any code. Just double-click on the runner, select your service .exe or .dll, and click ok. If you run the runner for the commandline, you'll see standard IO. –  Anderson Imes Oct 14 '08 at 7:32

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