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I'm trying to change my commit message using

git rebase -i HEAD~2

But when I do it i got a window with a message This application will not run on your computer. Sorry!

At terminal I have:

/System/Library/Frameworks/Ruby.framework/Versions/2.0/
 usr/lib/ruby/2.0.0/universal-darwin13/rbconfig.rb:212: 
 warning: Insecure world writable dir /Volumes/SSS/Work in PATH, mode 040777
button returned:OK
Successfully rebased and updated refs/heads/master.

I have OSX 10.9. What is wrong with it?


More info:

  1. git version 1.7.11.3

  2. I should not have hooks. But may be I miss something. (I checked ~/.gitconfig)

  3. When I change core.editor from emacs to nano the error disappear. So the problem seems to be emacs-related.

share|improve this question
    
Since you're using rebase -i, perhaps it's your configured editor that's causing issues? What does git config --get core.editor return? –  robertklep Nov 16 '13 at 8:47
    
@robertklep, I updated my answer. –  klm123 Nov 16 '13 at 9:12
1  
It is related to Emacs, see this piece of code which contains the error you're getting. Don't know how to solve this though, not an Emacs nor a Ruby expert :) –  robertklep Nov 16 '13 at 9:17
    
Yes. I changed to nano and this helped. –  klm123 Nov 16 '13 at 9:20
1  
Oh, I see now, well, that's some Ruby script that generates the error. What I meant by my previous comment is that you would still be in terminal when using magit, it doesn't have to be one or the other. –  user797257 Nov 17 '13 at 10:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem was that I use alias emacs for MacOS's Emacs. It was solved by changing:

editor = emacs -nw

to

editor = Emacs -nw

in ~/.gitconfig

share|improve this answer
    
Good catch, and good feedback. +1 –  VonC Nov 17 '13 at 8:27

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