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I'm trying to write a bash script that will get the output of a command that runs in the background. Unfortunately I can't get it to work, the variable I assign the output to is empty - if I replace the assignment with an echo command everything works as expected though.

#!/bin/bash

function test {
    echo "$1"
}

echo $(test "echo") &
wait

a=$(test "assignment") &
wait

echo $a

echo done

This code produces the output:

echo

done

Changing the assignment to

a=`echo $(test "assignment") &`

works, but it seems like there should be a better way of doing this.

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Thanks for the reply. I'm trying avoid having to use a file, if there's no other way I'll just use the echo command. –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 11:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Bash has indeed a feature called Process Substitution to accomplish this.

$ echo <(yes)
/dev/fd/63

Here, the expression <(yes) is replaced with a pathname of a (pseudo device) file that is connected to the standard output of an asynchronous job yes (which prints the string y in an endless loop).

Now let's try to read from it:

$ cat /dev/fd/63
cat: /dev/fd/63: No such file or directory

The problem here is that the yes process terminated in the meantime because it received a SIGPIPE (it had no readers on stdout).

The solution is the following construct

$ exec 3< <(yes)  # Save stdout of the 'yes' job as (input) fd 3.

This opens the file as input fd 3 before the background job is started.

You can now read from the background job whenever you prefer. For a stupid example

$ for i in 1 2 3; do read <&3 line; echo "$line"; done
y
y
y

Note that this has slightly different semantics than having the background job write to a drive backed file: the background job will be blocked when the buffer is full (you empty the buffer by reading from the fd). By contrast, writing to a drive-backed file is only blocking when the hard drive doesn't respond.

Process substitution is not a POSIX sh feature.

Here's a quick hack to give an asynchronous job drive backing (almost) without assigning a filename to it:

$ yes > backingfile &  # Start job in background writing to a new file. Do also look at `mktemp(3)` and the `sh` option `set -o noclobber`
$ exec 3< backingfile  # open the file for reading in the current shell, as fd 3
$ rm backingfile       # remove the file. It will disappear from the filesystem, but there is still a reader and a writer attached to it which both can use it.

$ for i in 1 2 3; do read <&3 line; echo "$line"; done
y
y
y

Linux also recently got added the O_TEMPFILE option, which makes such hacks possible without the file ever being visible at all. I don't know if bash already supports it.

UPDATE:

@rthur, if you want to capture the whole output from fd 3, then use

output=$(cat <&3)

But note that you can't capture binary data in general: It's only a defined operation if the output is text in the POSIX sense. The implementations I know simply filter out all NUL bytes. Furthermore POSIX specifies that all trailing newlines must be removed.

(Please note also that capturing the output will result in OOM if the writer never stops (yes never stops). But naturally that problem holds even for read if the line separator is never written additionally)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that looks great! Is there any way to get all the output from a reader without looping through every line? –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 14:17
    
Am I correct in assuming that calling read line also acts as a call to "wait"? –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 14:20
    
Caution: if you want to use this in real life scripts, you'll need to create the file backingfile with mktemp and even use a trap as the combo >/exec/rm is not atomic! –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 16 '13 at 14:31
    
@gniourf_gniourf Using it without the -d switch seemed to make it wait too - could it just be an impression caused by read line waiting for there to be at least one line in the buffer? –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 14:40
    
@gniourf_gniourf: This is all irrelevant to the actual question. –  Jo So Nov 16 '13 at 15:08

One very robust way to deal with coprocesses in Bash is to use... the coproc builtin.

Suppose you have a script or function called banana you wish to run in background, capture all its output while doing some stuff and wait until it's done. I'll do the simulation with this:

banana() {
    for i in {1..4}; do
        echo "gorilla eats banana $i"
        sleep 1
    done
    echo "gorilla says thank you for the delicious bananas"
}

stuff() {
    echo "I'm doing this stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm doing that stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm done doing my stuff."
}

You will then run banana with the coproc as so:

coproc bananafd { banana; }

this is like running banana & but with the following extras: it creates two file descriptors that are in the array bananafd (at index 0 for output and index 1 for input). You'll capture the output of banana with the read builtin:

IFS= read -r -d '' -u "${bananafd[0]}" banana_output

Try it:

#!/bin/bash

banana() {
    for i in {1..4}; do
        echo "gorilla eats banana $i"
        sleep 1
    done
    echo "gorilla says thank you for the delicious bananas"
}

stuff() {
    echo "I'm doing this stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm doing that stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm done doing my stuff."
}

coproc bananafd { banana; }

stuff

IFS= read -r -d '' -u "${bananafd[0]}" banana_output

echo "$banana_output"

Caveat: you must be done with stuff before banana ends! if the gorilla is quicker than you:

#!/bin/bash

banana() {
    for i in {1..4}; do
        echo "gorilla eats banana $i"
    done
    echo "gorilla says thank you for the delicious bananas"
}

stuff() {
    echo "I'm doing this stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm doing that stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm done doing my stuff."
}

coproc bananafd { banana; }

stuff

IFS= read -r -d '' -u "${bananafd[0]}" banana_output

echo "$banana_output"

In this case, you'll obtain an error like this one:

./banana: line 22: read: : invalid file descriptor specification

You can check whether it's too late (i.e., whether you've taken too long doing your stuff) because after the coproc is done, bash removes the values in the array bananafd, and that's why we obtained the previous error.

#!/bin/bash

banana() {
    for i in {1..4}; do
        echo "gorilla eats banana $i"
    done
    echo "gorilla says thank you for the delicious bananas"
}

stuff() {
    echo "I'm doing this stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm doing that stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm done doing my stuff."
}

coproc bananafd { banana; }

stuff

if [[ -n ${bananafd[@]} ]]; then
    IFS= read -r -d '' -u "${bananafd[0]}" banana_output
    echo "$banana_output"
else
    echo "oh no, I took too long doing my stuff..."
fi

Finally, if you really don't want to miss any of gorilla's moves, even if you take too long for your stuff, you could copy banana's file descriptor to another fd, says 3, do your stuff and then read from 3:

#!/bin/bash

banana() {
    for i in {1..4}; do
        echo "gorilla eats banana $i"
        sleep 1
    done
    echo "gorilla says thank you for the delicious bananas"
}

stuff() {
    echo "I'm doing this stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm doing that stuff"
    sleep 1
    echo "I'm done doing my stuff."
}

coproc bananafd { banana; }

# Copy file descriptor banana[0] to 3
exec 3>&${bananafd[0]}

stuff

IFS= read -d '' -u 3 output
echo "$output"

This will work very well! the last read will also play the role of wait, so that output will contain the complete output of banana.

That was great: no temp files to deal with (bash handles everything silently) and 100% pure bash!

Hope this helps!

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Thanks for the detailed reply. I ended up using Jo So's answer as it seemed like a simpler way of passing the output of a command to another fd - coproc does seem useful though. –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 14:23
1  
@user2352030 JoSo's answer is not simpler at all! it's even more complicated as it forces you to create a file and remove it. And if you want to use his answer in a secure way, you'll need to use mktemp... and even probably with a trap! don't get fooled by what seems simpler! –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 16 '13 at 14:28
    
Maybe I'm wrong, but from what I understood his portable sh shell method forces me to do that, but using the bash construct exec 3< <(command) does not. –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 14:34
    
@user2352030 another advantage of coproc is that you'll be able to determine whether the backgrounded process has finished by checking if the array bananafd is set. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 16 '13 at 14:36
    
@rthur yes you're right, as was talking about the last method. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 16 '13 at 14:37

One way to capture background command's output is to redirect it's output in a file and capture output from file after background process has ended:

test "assignment" > /tmp/_out &
wait
a=$(</tmp/_out)
share|improve this answer
    
Is there anyway to do this without using files? –  rthur Nov 16 '13 at 11:27
    
Don't think so since job is running in background therefore file/FIFO is the only way to capture it's output. –  anubhava Nov 16 '13 at 11:29
    
Yes, there is a (bash-only) way. See my answer. –  Jo So Nov 16 '13 at 11:55
    
@JoSo: Thanks for educating me. +1 to your answer. –  anubhava Nov 16 '13 at 17:33

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