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i found good code to do some polynomial least squares fitting based on GSL.

i am using it with 3 degrees: y = Cx² + Bx + A.

In my application i know that A must be zero. Is it possible to change the algorithm so that A alway will be zero?

bool polynomialfit(int obs, int degree, 
           double *dx, double *dy, double *store) /* n, p */
{
  gsl_multifit_linear_workspace *ws;
  gsl_matrix *cov, *X;
  gsl_vector *y, *c;
  double chisq;

  int i, j;

  X = gsl_matrix_alloc(obs, degree);
  y = gsl_vector_alloc(obs);
  c = gsl_vector_alloc(degree);
  cov = gsl_matrix_alloc(degree, degree);

  for(i=0; i < obs; i++) {
    gsl_matrix_set(X, i, 0, 1.0);
    for(j=0; j < degree; j++) {
      gsl_matrix_set(X, i, j, pow(dx[i], j));
    }
    gsl_vector_set(y, i, dy[i]);
  }

  ws = gsl_multifit_linear_alloc(obs, degree);
  gsl_multifit_linear(X, y, c, cov, &chisq, ws);

  /* store result ... */
  for(i=0; i < degree; i++)
  {
    store[i] = gsl_vector_get(c, i);
  }

  gsl_multifit_linear_free(ws);
  gsl_matrix_free(X);
  gsl_matrix_free(cov);
  gsl_vector_free(y);
  gsl_vector_free(c);
  return true; /* we do not "analyse" the result (cov matrix mainly)
  to know if the fit is "good" */
}
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What have you tried so far? – EvilTeach Nov 16 '13 at 13:08
    
If your data is compatible with the prior assumption, then the minimization will indeed confirm that. There is no need to set A = 0. But if you want to compare fits, GSL clear states that X is an n by p matrix where p = number of unknowns parameters. Then you just need to delete the line associated with x^0 to set A=0 – Vinicius Miranda Nov 16 '13 at 19:51

You can replace y by y' = y/x and then perform fitting of a 1. degree polynomial y'= Cx + B?

(if point x = 0 is present in your data set you have to remove it but this point does not improve fit in case you want to apply the A = 0 constraint, you can still use it to re-compute goodness of fit)

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In the code you posted there is this loop:

for(j=0; j < degree; j++) {
   gsl_matrix_set(X, i, j, pow(dx[i], j));
}

and the function pow computes the x^j terms, you have to "ignore" the term where j==0.

I have no access to GSL and so the following is just off the top of my head and it is untested:

bool polynomialfit(int obs, int polynom_degree, 
           double *dx, double *dy, double *store) /* n, p */
{
  gsl_multifit_linear_workspace *ws;
  gsl_matrix *cov, *X;
  gsl_vector *y, *c;
  double chisq;

  int i, j;
  int degree = polynom_degree - 1;

  X = gsl_matrix_alloc(obs, degree);
  y = gsl_vector_alloc(obs);
  c = gsl_vector_alloc(degree);
  cov = gsl_matrix_alloc(degree, degree);

  for(i=0; i < obs; i++) {
    gsl_matrix_set(X, i, 0, 1.0);
    for(j=0; j < degree; j++) {
      gsl_matrix_set(X, i, j, pow(dx[i], j+1));
    }
    gsl_vector_set(y, i, dy[i]);
  }

  ws = gsl_multifit_linear_alloc(obs, degree);
  gsl_multifit_linear(X, y, c, cov, &chisq, ws);

  /* store result ... */
  for(i=0; i < degree; i++)
  {
    store[i] = gsl_vector_get(c, i);
  }

  gsl_multifit_linear_free(ws);
  gsl_matrix_free(X);
  gsl_matrix_free(cov);
  gsl_vector_free(y);
  gsl_vector_free(c);
  return true; /* we do not "analyse" the result (cov matrix mainly)
  to know if the fit is "good" */
}

In order to fit to y=c*x*x+b*x you have to call it with polynom_degree set to 3.

You also may have a look at the theory:

Weisstein, Eric W. "Least Squares Fitting--Polynomial." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/LeastSquaresFittingPolynomial.html

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