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I'm trying to write a Tornado request handler which makes asynchronous HTTP requests, and returns data to the client as it receives it from it's async requests. Unfortunately, I'm unable to get Tornado to return any data to the client until all of it's Async HTTPRequests have completed.

A demo of my request handler is below.

class StreamingHandler(web.RequestHandler):

    all_requested = False
    requests = []

    @web.asynchronous
    def get(self):

        http_client = httpclient.AsyncHTTPClient()
        self.write('some opening')

        big_request = httpclient.HTTPRequest(url='[some_big_request]', streaming_callback=self.on_chunk)
        small_request = httpclient.HTTPRequest(url='[some_small_request]', streaming_callback=self.on_chunk)

        self.requests.append(http_client.fetch(big_request, callback=self.on_response_complete))
        self.requests.append(http_client.fetch(small_request, callback=self.on_response_complete))

        self.all_requested = True

    def on_chunk(self, chunk):
        self.write('some chunk')
        self.flush()

    def on_response_complete(self, response):
        if self.all_requested and all(request.done() for request in self.requests):
            self.write('some closing')
            self.finish()

I would expect a GET request to this handler to initially return the text 'some opening', then quite quickly return 'some chunk' for the small request, and later return 'some chunk' (potentially multiple times) for the larger request, before finally returning 'some closing', and closing the connection. Instead, after making the connection, the client waits a few seconds for all requests to complete, and then receives all of the HTTPResponse at once, before closing.

How would I go about getting my desired behaviour from Tornado?

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

Decorate your method with gen.coroutine and yield a list of futures. Here's a simple example:

from tornado import gen, web, httpclient

class StreamingHandler(web.RequestHandler):
    @web.asynchronous
    @gen.coroutine
    def get(self):
        client = httpclient.AsyncHTTPClient()

        self.write('some opening')
        self.flush()

        requests = [
            httpclient.HTTPRequest(
                url='http://httpbin.org/delay/' + str(delay),
                streaming_callback=self.on_chunk
            ) for delay in [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
        ]

        # `map()` doesn't return a list in Python 3
        yield list(map(client.fetch, requests))

        self.write('some closing')
        self.finish()

    def on_chunk(self, chunk):
        self.write('some chunk')
        self.flush()

Notice that even though the requests are yielded "backwards", the first chunk will still be received after about a second. If you sent them out synchronously, it'd take you 15 seconds. When you request them asynchronously, it takes you just 5.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for this. A few questions though: can you explain why my code doesn't work and yours does? It seems to be down to some mystical use of 'yield' with tornado.gen.coroutine. How can you guarantee that once you've yielded a list of futures, that the requests are complete and it's safe to write 'some closing'? –  majackson Nov 19 '13 at 10:07
2  
@majackson: That's the way Tornado implements coroutines. By using yield, your function becomes a generator, so you can effectively start and stop it at the points where you yield tasks. When you yield a task (or list of tasks, which Tornado performs all at once), you tell Tornado's IOLoop that it can "stop" the execution of your function and do other stuff. When it "gets back" to your function, it'll start where it left off. Your function's code will still be executed top to bottom, but Tornado will jump around to other functions as well. This is sort of like how Node.js does it. –  Blender Dec 23 '13 at 3:50

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