Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As mentioned in the title, I'm looking for a way to convert a char* (coming from argv) to a uint16_t. The command line argument is a port number, and so, can't be > to 65535, nor negative.

Currently, I did this (compiling with -std=gnu99):

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

/*
 * Converts a string to an unsigned int and stores the result in "res".
 */
bool str_to_uint(const char* str, unsigned long int* res) {
    if (str[0] == '-')
        return false;
    char* first_wrong_character;
    uintmax_t result = strtoumax(str, &first_wrong_character, 10);
    if ((result == UINTMAX_MAX) && (errno == ERANGE))
        return false; // Overflow)
    if ((*str != '\0') && (*first_wrong_character != '\0'))
        return false; // Not everything has been converted
    if ((result == 0) && (str == first_wrong_character))
        return false; // Nothing to convert
    *res = result;
    return true;
}

/*
 * Converts a string to an uint16_t and stores the result in "res".
 */
bool str_to_uint16(const char* str, uint16_t* res) {
    unsigned long uint;
    if (!str_to_uint(str, &uint))
        return false;
    if (uint > UINT16_MAX)
        return false;
    *res = (uint16_t)uint;
    return true;
}

I'm not sure it's the best way to do it, so if you could tell me what is the good way ?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use strtol(3) that is able to return an error in case of integer overflow (ERANGE), and simply check if the parsed integer is not too large vs. the uint16_t capacity:

#include <stdint.h> /* fixed-width integer types */
#include <stdlib.h> /* strtol */
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <errno.h>

static bool
str_to_uint16(const char *str, uint16_t *res)
{
  long int val = strtol(str, NULL, 10);
  if (errno == ERANGE || val > UINT16_MAX || val < 0)
    return false;
  *res = (uint16_t) val;
  return true;
}

EDIT

Since the question concerns C99, and if I include a better error management (thanks to @nwellnhof and @chux) I would say the version below should be the right candidate:

#include <inttypes.h> /* strtoimax */

static bool
str_to_uint16(const char *str, uint16_t *res)
{
  char *end;
  errno = 0;
  intmax_t val = strtoimax(str, &end, 10);
  if (errno == ERANGE || val < 0 || val > UINT16_MAX || end == str || *end != '\0')
    return false;
  *res = (uint16_t) val;
  return true;
}

It succeeds with:

  • 1981
  • 65535 (UINT16_MAX)

It returns a conversion error (as expected) with:

  • 65536 (UINT16_MAX+1)
  • a1981
  • 1981a
  • abcd
  • 9223372036854775808 (INTMAX_MAX+1: in such a case ERANGE occurs)
  • -9223372036854775809 (INTMAX_MIN-1: in such a case ERANGE occurs)
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this with an overflow number (65536) and I got 0 in my variable instead of getting an error. Moreover, PRIu16 is "%u" and not "%hu" (h = short). BTW, I don't know why PRIu16 is not %hu. –  Thibaut D. Nov 16 '13 at 16:20
    
I've updated my answer: sscanf is indeed not a good idea because it can't protect from integer overflow. strtol is thus the right candidate (see above). –  deltheil Nov 16 '13 at 16:26
    
@chux: thanks! Fixed in my last edit. –  deltheil Nov 16 '13 at 18:18
add comment

There's no need to use strtoumax. I'd go with the more portable strtol. The error handling can also be simplified to something like this:

bool str_to_uint16(const char *str, uint16_t *res) {
    char *end;
    errno = 0;
    long val = strtol(str, &end, 10);
    if (errno || end == str || *end != '\0' || val < 0 || val >= 0x10000) {
        return false;
    }
    *res = (uint16_t)val;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You error management (vs the end checks) is better than mine :) But I guess you meant 0x10000 instead of 0x1000 for the upper bound, right? –  deltheil Nov 16 '13 at 16:36
1  
In this case what's the goal of strtoumax() ? Why not use strtoul in your example ? And what is 0x1000 ? –  Thibaut D. Nov 16 '13 at 16:37
1  
Right, I meant 0x10000. Fixed. –  nwellnhof Nov 16 '13 at 16:50
2  
val > UINT16_MAX would be better. –  chux Nov 16 '13 at 18:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.