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Xcode 5 is supposed to improve the management of subprojects from different repositories. According to the documentation, dragging a subproject into a workspace will ask whether or not the new project should be included in the workspace and automatically checked out with the main project.

However when I do this, and accept this message, the subproject seems to be added as part of the main project, instead of a separate independent project from a different repository (using git submodule)

With git status I get a bunch of "Untracked files" for the new project I added to the workspace. This is exactly what I would expect when I add new files that I intend to add to the main project directly. But obviously I don't want to add the subproject's files to the main repository.

This is what I do:

  1. In Finder, drag the entire subproject into MainProject/Libraries.
  2. Drag MainProject/Libraries/SubProject/SubProject.xcodeproj into the workspace.
  3. When asked I accept to "Share Working Copy".
  4. Using git status I get

    # Changes to be committed:
    #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
    #
    #   new file:   Libraries/SubProject/SubProject.xcodeproj/project.pbxproj
    #   new file:   Libraries/SubProject/SubProject.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/contents.xcworkspacedata
    #   new file:   Libraries/SubProject/SubProject.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/xcshareddata/SubProject.xccheckout
    #   new file:   Libraries/SubProject/SubProject.xcodeproj/project.xcworkspace/xcshareddata/WorkspaceSettings.xcsettings
    
    # Untracked files:
    #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
    #
    #   Libraries/SubProject/.gitignore
    #   Libraries/SubProject/SubProject
    #   Libraries/SubProject/SubProjectTest
    #   Libraries/SubProject/DemoApp
    
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1 Answer 1

If you look at your workspace's xccheckout file (workspace/xcshareddata/MyProject.xccheckout), you'll see something like this:

<key>IDESourceControlProjectOriginsDictionary</key>
<dict>
    <key>291D49C7-ABC9-4A7B-95B7-A7988B531D68</key>
    <string>https://github.com/whatever/whatever.git</string>
    <key>77C26974-A34E-46C6-BFCB-6753E157F937</key>
    <string>file:///Users/me/Dropbox/MyProject/</string>
</dict>
<key>IDESourceControlProjectRelativeInstallPathDictionary</key>
<dict>
    <key>291D49C7-ABC9-4A7B-95B7-A7988B531D68</key>
    <string>../../whatever</string>
    <key>77C26974-A34E-46C6-BFCB-6753E157F937</key>
    <string>../..</string>
</dict>

So it appears that Xcode is noting down where the subproject is relative to the workspace, and where its origin is. In this case, the workspace origin is on Dropbox and the 'whatever' subproject is cloned from GitHub. The 'whatever' project is checked out at the same level of the folder hierarchy as the main project folder - it's not a subfolder.

i.e.

|-- Projects
|------ whatever  (cloned from GitHub origin)
|------ MyProject (cloned from Dropbox origin)
|---------- MyProject.xcworkspace
|---------- MyProject.xcproj
|---------- ...

Xcode also notes down which revision the working copy is at, so that when the next person comes along and checks out/copies your project and is missing the 'whatever' project, Xcode can check it out for them (and stick it in the same relative directory).

You'll note that git submodules don't come in to it. This is an Xcode feature. It allows you to have one working copy of a particular project, but have it added as a subproject in multiple other projects (that's why it said "share working copy"). So in the example above, I could have another project (MyOtherProject) which references the same working copy of 'whatever'. You could also mix-and-match VCS systems (presuming Xcode supports all of them).

If, as in your case, you've cloned the subproject in to your main project's hierarchy, you effectively get a submodule.

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