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I'm trying to create a timer, that after the timer ends, will call a function...

For example, I have the function Foo. I want to create a timer, that after 1.5 seconds will call it..

Something like :

Timer(Foo(), 2000);

I have found this code :

    private Handler handler = new Handler(); // Creating new handler
    handler.postDelayed(runnable, 1500); // Creating a timer for 1.5 seconds

and this function :

private Runnable runnable = new Runnable() 
{
       @Override
       public void run() 
       {
          Foo();

          handler.postDelayed(this, 1500);
       }
    };

My problem is, that some times the timer works perfect, usually for the first 2~3 times, and after that, Instead of being a 1.5sec timer, it become something like 0.3sec timer (and the more handler.postDelayed(runnable, 1500); is being called, the less time the timer will last (like, wont wait 1.5sec to call Foo, but much less)

Why is that ? I know that in C++ if I write Console Applications, I can use Sleep.. Maybe I can just do something like this :

Sleep(1500);
Foo();

Thanks!

Edit: I have answered my own question.

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1  
Is it possible that you have multiple instances creating timers? That is, could one object be creating a timer to be fired 1500 ms, then 300 ms later, another instance creates a similar timer, so you eventually get lots of things firing with short intervals between them? –  Kristopher Johnson Nov 16 '13 at 20:53
    
Nope. You have to click a button to create the instance of the timer, and I made sure I click each time the button at least5 sec apart (and it's a 1.5sec timer).... –  Amit Nov 16 '13 at 21:04
    
Can you show that part of the code where you handle button click and create timer? –  Melquiades Nov 16 '13 at 21:28
    
I have a button. I got a onClick function that relates to the button. then I simply put inside the function handler.postDelayed(runnable, 1500); –  Amit Nov 16 '13 at 21:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use the Timer class in Android, and set a repeating timer, with a initial delay.

Timer timer = new Timer();
timer.schedule(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)

A TimerTask is very much like a Runnable.

See: http://developer.android.com/reference/java/util/Timer.html

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I have used the following code: Timer timer = new Timer(); timer.schedule(Foo(), 1500); and the function signature is : public TimerTask Foo() though I get a runtime error, and the application just crashes... –  Amit Nov 16 '13 at 20:59

I've used 2 timers :

handler.postDelayed(runnable, 1500); // Creating a timer for 1.5 seconds

this created a 1.5sec timer, while inside the timer loop :

private Runnable runnable = new Runnable() 
{
   @Override
   public void run() 
   {
      Foo();

      handler.postDelayed(this, 1500);
   }
};

I called handler.postDelayed(this,1500); again, which made 2 timers -> causing the time bug.

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