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It would be great if somebody could explain what is going on.

 (ii <- order(x <- c(1,1,3:1,1:4,3), y <- c(9,9:1), z <- c(2,1:9)))
 ## 6  5  2  1  7  4 10  8  3  9

Yes, I did read the manual, that's from where I got the example in the first place.

What is ii?

EDIT: Considering a simpler example:

x <- c(1,1,3:1,1:4,3)
[1] 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 3 4 3                (&)
order(x)
[1]  1  2  5  6  4  7  3  8 10  9     (&&)

All I'm getting here (I believe) is that the '10' in (&&) corresponds to the '4' in (&) and means that the '4' has sort of rank (or "level") 10. Right? Put differently, the '4' is the 10th element in the ordered x.

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marked as duplicate by Thomas, Tieson T., Steve Benett, Avadhani Y, zero323 Nov 17 '13 at 10:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
ii is simply a variable where the output of the order() function has been stored. –  gung Nov 17 '13 at 0:30
    
well, I do get that... but I don't really get what the output means –  TMOTTM Nov 17 '13 at 14:23
    
Did you read the linked thread? Do you still not get what it means after reading that & @SimonO101's answer below? Let me know if you're still confused after reading them & what exactly is still confusing you. –  gung Nov 17 '13 at 15:02
    
Yes, I get it from your post there: "?order tells you which element of the original vector needs to be put first, second, etc.," That explains it, thanks. –  TMOTTM Nov 17 '13 at 15:30
    
If you wanted to sort the vector c(45, 50, 10, 96) into ascending order (ie, 10 45 50 96), which element would you put 1st? It's the 3rd element, 10; the element you would put 2nd is the 1st number in the vector, 45; the element you would put 3rd is the 2nd number in the vector, 50; & the element you would put 4th is the 4th number in the vector, 96. So the output of order() for that vector is 3 1 2 4. –  gung Nov 17 '13 at 15:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It returns the order of each element in x, (not as some think the elements of x ordered). When there are two identical elements in the first argument to order (x in your example above ) ties are broken by further arguments to order (y and z in your order example). This visual example, showing the order returned will hopefully explain it in fewer words...

cbind(x[ii],y[ii],z[ii])
#      [,1] [,2] [,3]
# [1,]    1    5    5   |===> 4 values of 1 in x, first value is selected by lowest value (5) in y
# [2,]    1    6    4   |
# [3,]    1    9    1   |:==> both have 9 in y, tie is broken by 1 in z
# [4,]    1    9    2   |:==> value of 2 in z
# [5,]    2    4    6
# [6,]    2    7    3
# [7,]    3    1    9
# [8,]    3    3    7
# [9,]    3    8    2
#[10,]    4    2    8
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In this example: > x <- c(9, 6, 7, 8) I would expect that order(x) gives me back 4, 1, 2 3` but it returns 2, 3, 4, 1. How can I predict the result of order here in this simple example? –  TMOTTM Nov 17 '13 at 14:57
1  
@TMOTTM Sure. In this example the positions of the numbers in the x vector are: 9 = 1 , 6 = 2 , 7 = 3 , 8 = 4, now order the actual numbers, you get 6=2 , 7=3 , 8=4 , 9=1, hence the 2,3,4,1. Does that make sense?!!!! –  Simon O'Hanlon Nov 17 '13 at 17:17
    
totally does. appreciate it. –  TMOTTM Nov 17 '13 at 18:10

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