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 public class Bird
{
  private static int id = 0;
  private String kind;

   public Bird(String requiredKind)
   {
    id = id + 1;
    kind = requiredKind;
   }

    public String toString()
   {
        return "Kind: " + kind + ", Id: " + id + "; ";
   }

     public static void main(String [] args)
     {
         Bird [] birds = new Bird[2];
         birds[0] = new Bird("falcon");
         birds[1] = new Bird("eagle");
         for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
         System.out.print(birds[i]);
         System.out.println();
    }
} 

This is a question from a sample exam, The output is asked and the correct answer is Kind: falcon, Id: 2; Kind: eagle, Id: 2;

How does that make sense? for falcon shouldn't id be 1, then eagle since it's static id will be 2?

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1  
What's your question ? –  alfasin Nov 17 '13 at 5:12
    
@alfasin updated the question –  user2963817 Nov 17 '13 at 5:13
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
private static int id = 0;

The static means all instances will share the value

So everytime you instantiate Bird the value increases

public Bird(...){
    id = id + 1;
}

Bird bird1 = new Bird("faclon"); // id = 1
Bird bird2 = new Bird("eagle"); // id = 2

System.out.println(birdl);  // falcon id 2
System.out.println(bird2);  // eagle id 2

Let's say you did this

Bird bird1 = new Bird("falcon"); // id = 1
System.out.println(bird1);  // falcon id = 1

Bird bird2 = new Bird("eagle"); // id = 2
System.out.println(bird2);  // eagle id 2

System.out.println(bird1); // falcon id = 2

Bird bird = new Bird("elephant"); // id = 3

System.out.println(bird1); // falcon id 3

The difference is where the print statements are made.

Edit: for desired output

Bird[] birds = new Bird[2];
String[] birdNames = {"falcon", "eagle"};

for (int i = 0; i < birds.length; i++){
    birds[i] = new Bird(birdNames[i]);
    System.out.println(birds[i]);
}

In the above code, you will get

kind: falcon id: 1
kind: eagle id: 2

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can you take me through it step by step? how did it get to two, before 1? –  user2963817 Nov 17 '13 at 5:16
    
You can see in my example. Each time you create an object, id, increase by one. If you were to print the falcon id before you create a new Bird object, id would still be 1. But because they both share the value, if you create a new Bird object before you print the falcon id, falcon id is 2, because anyone object of Bird shares the value. –  peeskillet Nov 17 '13 at 5:19
    
See my edit. Maybe you'll get a better picture of what I am saying. –  peeskillet Nov 17 '13 at 5:22
    
add a print statement right after birds[0] = new Bird("falcon"); and you will see that falcon id is 1 –  peeskillet Nov 17 '13 at 5:32
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 public class Bird
  {
 private static int id = 0;   //initial value of id =0;
 private String kind;

 public Bird(String requiredKind)
 {
 id = id + 1;               //for first bird 0+1 so id=1 ,second bird 1+1 so id=2 
 kind = requiredKind;       
 }

 public String toString()
{
    return "Kind: " + kind + ", Id: " + id + "; ";  //here return the values
}

  public static void main(String [] args)
  {
     Bird [] birds = new Bird[2];
     birds[0] = new Bird("falcon");   // id = 1 
     birds[1] = new Bird("eagle");    // id = 2
     for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)   // here loop for string values 
     System.out.print(birds[i]);   
     System.out.println();        
}
} 
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