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Let's say I have two generic lists of the same type. How do I combine them into one generic list of that type?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

This should do the trick

List<Type> list1;
List<Type> list2;

List<Type> combined;
combined.AddRange(list1);
combined.AddRange(list2);
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Is this the most efficient, or the most convenient way? –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 4 '10 at 22:37
1  
pstst .AddRange, Java is over there -> –  blu Jan 4 '10 at 22:39
3  
Why not just do list1.AddRange(list2)? It meets the requirements without having to create an additional list, and saves an entire add. –  Erich Jan 4 '10 at 22:43
1  
Err, no, that's not necessarily a better way. You're assuming that it's OK to modify the first list (for that matter, why not do it to the second list instead?) when that's not made clear. –  Adam Robinson Jan 4 '10 at 22:46
2  
And what about the null exception? ;) Ok I am kidding.. –  nawfal Nov 8 '12 at 20:54

You can simply add the items from one list to the other:

list1.AddRange(list2);

If you want to keep the lists and create a new one:

List<T> combined = new List<T>(list1);
combined.AddRange(list2);

Or using LINQ methods:

List<T> combined = list1.Concat(list2).ToList();

You can get a bit better performance by creating a list with the correct capacity before adding the items to it:

List<T> combined = new List<T>(list1.Count + list2.Count);
combined.AddRange(list1);
combined.AddRange(list2);
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What is difference between join keyword and this way u declared? –  Hemant Kumar Dec 1 '10 at 5:23

If you're using C# 3.0/.Net 3.5:

List<SomeType> list1;
List<SomeType> list2;

var list = list1.Concat(list2).ToList();
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As a clarification, this requires .NET 3.5, not just C# 3.0 (extension methods are a part of C# 3.0, but the System.Linq.Enumerable class that defines them is part of .NET 3.5) –  Adam Robinson Jan 4 '10 at 22:45
    
@Adam Robinson: Thanks for the precision. –  Rafa Castaneda Jan 4 '10 at 22:52
1  
This can work on .NET 2.0 if you use VS2008 and LinqBridge ;) –  Thomas Levesque Jan 4 '10 at 23:22

Using the .AddRange() method

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z883w3dc.aspx

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