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I have run across code that invokes a function as fn(a,b,c) but the definition of fn is fn(a,b) and then inside the author invokes arguments[2] which would imply a third undeclared argument. Is this legit? (I am new to the site and tried to search for a related question before posting, but was unable to find one. If there is a custom for doing so, I would love to be educated.) Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's allowed. It's usually better to specify good argument names and then check if they are null or not, for readability and sanity. People reading your code won't expect or understand that technique.

There are cases where it acceptable... for example:

function add(){
 var sum = 0;
 for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++){
  sum += arguments[i];
 } 
 return sum;
}

However, even in this case it would be better to add placeholder variable names for the sake of readers:

function add(val1, val2, etc){
 var sum = 0;
 for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++){
  sum += arguments[i];
 } 
 return sum;
}
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"People reading your code won't expect or understand that technique." Oh, damnit, stop underestimating your audience. –  bart Jan 4 '10 at 23:42
    
Javascript is probably the most common language used by people who don't really know how to program. I mean, you can write it in FrontPage, CMS systems, etc! Add to this that many programmers with years of experience are probably still learning or unaware of many of its unique features, and I'd say you should definitely underestimate your audience! –  Graza Jan 5 '10 at 0:03
    
Thank you - excellent explanation! –  Dave Jan 5 '10 at 2:17
    
personally, I think the add(val1, val2, etc) is incorrect - it declares the variables and then never uses them. If you must give a hint, put those variables in comments, e.g. add(/* val1, val2, ... */) –  Alnitak Aug 31 '12 at 14:50
    
Comments won't show up under any IDE I know of, but argument names will. The variables are used, but those aliases are not. –  Computer Linguist Aug 31 '12 at 19:11

Legal. Ugly, but legal.

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Its ugly, BUT is also used in many javascript frameworks, such as jQuery. There are obvious advantages to using it for some purposes, but I'd follow these general rules:

  • don't use it simply because some (known) arguments are optional. Instead, name the arguments (or take an object as an argument instead) and check the arguments (or object's properties) explicitly for null or undefined
  • if the method is something that could potentially take an unknown/infinite number of arguments, it would make sense to use this approach, for example if you were for some reason creating a custom concat() method, you might want to allow any number of arguments
  • if you do use it, comment any parts of the code that may be confusing to follow, in particular, you'd want to comment/document how the function should be called
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1  
Agree with these guidelines. I find jQuery's crazy overloaded interfaces a good example of exactly what you should not do with varargs. The code is unreadable and it's very easy to accidentally call the wrong variant of a method. –  bobince Jan 4 '10 at 23:50
    
Agreed re jQuery, however theres possibly a few reasons they do it this way... the first, which suits me just fine, is there's less method names to have to memorize, which also makes browsing the help a bit easier (IMHO, of course). Aside from that, code-size and probably optimisation play a part. One thing about any language, but much more so with runtime interpreted languages/scripts, is that the fastest code is probably the least legible code, but speed can be pretty important in js. My disclaimer here is that I'm basing this optimisation comment purely on my own speculation/assumption. –  Graza Jan 5 '10 at 0:41

Another alternative might be to pass an array as a single argument and iterate over its contents or an object (name value pairs) passing arguments of interest and ignoring others. I prefer to pass an object.

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It's legal, but I would avoid it as a matter of style. It's usually a better idea to declare the argument - by doing so, you make the meaning of the function more obvious. One can just look at the function name and argument list to (hopefully) get an idea of the function's purpose.

I'd reserve usage of the arguments array for completely variable-length argument lists, not just a single optional parameter.

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