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Is it possible in a sqlite database to craete a table that has a timestamp column that default to DATETIME('now') ?

Like this:

CREATE TABLE test (
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, 
    t TIMESTAMP DEFAULT DATETIME('now')
);

This gives an error... How to resolve?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 126 down vote accepted

i believe you can use

CREATE TABLE test (
  id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
  t TIMESTAMP
  DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
);

as of version 3.1 (source)

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6  
If you are concerned about storage size, note that this recipe will save your timestamps in ISO-8601 (a text format), taking up about 24 bytes in the database per date. You can save space by just using an INTEGER(4) column, and storing the unix time via "INSERT INTO test (t) values (strftime("%s", CURRENT_TIME));" –  mckoss Feb 5 '12 at 8:17
2  
@mckoss thanks to your comment, the create statement became: ... mycolumn default (strftime('%s','now')) –  larham1 Jun 15 '12 at 6:41
    
"... default (strftime('%s','now'))" is not constant expression, won't work with default giving "Error: default value of column [...] is not constant". –  Mirek Rusin Aug 4 '12 at 22:35
    
and me too, thanks! (technical gotcha, I was using NOW, just like that, and it turns out that due to sqlite's type affinity, it was being simply stored as a the string "NOW" in the database.) –  Luis Artola Jul 12 '13 at 17:29

according to dr. hipp in a recent list post:

CREATE TABLE whatever(
     ....
     timestamp DATE DEFAULT (datetime('now','localtime')),
     ...
);
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thanks - I was wondering how to create a default timestamp with local time rather than UTC –  hoju May 30 '10 at 14:40
    
Metoo, thanks for the localtime parameter –  pihentagy Nov 30 '10 at 13:00
    
Thank you so much! I wasn't satisfied with the format of CURRENT_TIMESTAMP so I created my own function in C to return the number of microseconds since the Epoch, and I'm glad I can use that as a DEFAULT now. –  Michael Jul 21 '14 at 17:10

It's just a syntax error, you need parenthesis: (DATETIME('now'))

If you look at the documentation, you'll note the parenthesis that is added around the 'expr' option in the syntax.

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It is syntax error because you did not write parenthesis

if you write

Select datetime('now') then it will give you utc time but if you this write it query then you must add parenthesis before this so (datetime('now')) for UTC Time. for local time same Select datetime('now','localtime') for query

(datetime('now','localtime'))

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This is a full example based on the other answers and comments to the question. In the example the timestamp (created_at-column) is saved as unix epoch UTC timezone and converted to local timezone only when necessary.

Using unix epoch saves storage space - 4 bytes integer vs. 24 bytes string when stored as ISO8601 string, see datatypes. If 4 bytes is not enough that can be increased to 6 or 8 bytes.

Saving timestamp on UTC timezone makes it convenient to show a reasonable value on multiple timezones.

SQLite version is 3.8.6 that ships with Ubuntu LTS 14.04.

$ sqlite3 so.db
SQLite version 3.8.6 2014-08-15 11:46:33
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
sqlite> .headers on

create table if not exists example (
   id integer primary key autoincrement
  ,data text not null unique
  ,created_at integer(4) not null default (strftime('%s','now'))
);

insert into example(data) values
 ('foo')
,('bar')
;

select
 id
,data
,created_at as epoch
,datetime(created_at, 'unixepoch') as utc
,datetime(created_at, 'unixepoch', 'localtime') as localtime
from example
order by id
;

id|data|epoch     |utc                |localtime
1 |foo |1412097842|2014-09-30 17:24:02|2014-09-30 20:24:02
2 |bar |1412097842|2014-09-30 17:24:02|2014-09-30 20:24:02

Localtime is correct as I'm located at UTC+2 DST at the moment of the query.

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It may be better to use REAL type, to save storage space.

Quote from 1.2 section of Datatypes In SQLite Version 3

SQLite does not have a storage class set aside for storing dates and/or times. Instead, the built-in Date And Time Functions of SQLite are capable of storing dates and times as TEXT, REAL, or INTEGER values

CREATE TABLE test (
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, 
    t REAL DEFAULT (datetime('now', 'localtime'))
);

see column-constraint .

And insert a row without providing any value.

INSERT INTO "test" DEFAULT VALUES;
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I prefer integer(n) where one can pick the suitable value for n. –  user272735 Sep 30 '14 at 17:56

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