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I recently started working on some code which required the use of sets. So I went to Hoogle and searched for a existing solution, which I found in the module Data.Set. Unfortunately, Hoogle turned up the documentation for the Set included in the containers-0.5.3.1 package. This version contained the handy findIndex method, which I planned my program around.

But the Haskell platform only comes with containers-0.5.0.0, in which findIndex is not available. As I may only use the libraries coming with the Haskell platform, I am searching for a way to include this function or define it myself. Straight up copying the methods source code from http://hackage.haskell.org/package/containers-0.5.3.1/docs/src/Data-Set.html obviously did not work. I hope you can help me find a solution to my problem.

Thanks a lot.

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1  
I suppose you need it to be O (log n)? Otherwise, there's of course a trivial implementation with toAscList. – leftaroundabout Nov 17 '13 at 14:32
    
Have you been introduced to cabal sandboxes? While it wouldn't solve your problem exactly, it should allow you to install whatever version of containers you like for each project. – bheklilr Nov 17 '13 at 14:55
    
@leftaroundabout Sadly, yes I need O(log n). bheklilr: No I have not been introduced to those. But as you said, they will not solve my problem as I need to use 0.5.0.0 conainers. – rog4 Nov 17 '13 at 15:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do it with splitMember:

lookupIndex :: (Ord a) => a -> Set a -> Maybe Int
lookupIndex x s
   | found      = Just $ size l
   | otherwise  = Nothing
 where (l, found, _) = splitMember x s
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