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When I load the images to show to the UICollectionView I load all the images from the array like this

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    allImagesArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);
    NSString *documentsDirectory = [paths objectAtIndex:0];
    NSString *location=@"Others";
    NSString *fPath = [documentsDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent:location];
    NSArray *directoryContent = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] directoryContentsAtPath: fPath];
    collectionOthers.delegate =self;
    collectionOthers.dataSource=self;
    for(NSString *str in directoryContent)
    {
        NSString *finalFilePath = [fPath stringByAppendingPathComponent:str];
        NSData *data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:finalFilePath];
        if(data)
        {
            UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithData:data];
            [allImagesArray addObject:image];
            NSLog(@"array:%@",[allImagesArray description]);
            image = nil;

        }
        finalFilePath=nil;
        data=nil;
    }

    paths= nil;
    documentsDirectory= nil;
    location= nil;
    fPath= nil;
    directoryContent = nil;
}

This is the biggest issue in my app since it uses so many memory. It is because number and size of the images, this could just take up memory. I would only want to load images when they are needed, and discard them when they are no longer needed.However I do not know where and how to change my code so that it will be that way. I am doing this for three month or so and I really need help.
Update
This is my code for the specific part

-(UICollectionViewCell *)collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *reuseID = @"ReuseID";
    OthersCell *mycell = (OthersCell *) [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:reuseID forIndexPath:indexPath];
    UIImageView *imageInCell = (UIImageView*)[mycell viewWithTag:1];
    imageInCell.image = [allImagesArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
    NSLog(@"a");
    return mycell;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Clearly, you should load the images just-in-time. One should never hold an array of images (because they take up a lot of memory), but rather just hold an array of filenames. So I'm suggesting you retire allImagesArray and instead define a NSMutableArray called filenames. You could then create the UIImage objects on the fly:

- (UICollectionViewCell *)collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *cellIdentifier = @"Cell";
    OthersCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];
    UIImageView *imageInCell = (UIImageView*)[cell viewWithTag:1];

    imageInCell.image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:filenames[indexPath.item]];

    return cell;
}

This, assumes, of course, that you populated this NSMutableArray of filenames in viewDidLoad:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    filenames = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);
    NSString *documentsDirectory = [paths objectAtIndex:0];
    NSString *location=@"Others";
    NSString *fPath = [documentsDirectory stringByAppendingPathComponent:location];
    NSArray *directoryContent = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] directoryContentsAtPath: fPath];
    collectionOthers.delegate =self;
    collectionOthers.dataSource=self;
    for(NSString *str in directoryContent)
    {
        NSString *finalFilePath = [fPath stringByAppendingPathComponent:str];
        [filenames addObject:fileFilePath];
    }
}

This has a problem, though, because imageWithContentsOfFile (as well as loading it into a NSData first and then doing imageWithData) is a bit slow if the images aren't tiny. On slower devices, this can result in a slight stuttering of a quick scroll of a collection view. So, a better approach would be to (a) load the images asynchronously; (b) use a NSCache to optimize performance for when you scroll backwards.

So, first, define a cache:

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSCache *imageCache;

And, instantiate this in viewDidLoad:

self.imageCache = [[NSCache alloc] init];
self.imageCache.name = @"com.company.app.imageCache";

And then, cellForItemAtIndexPath can (a) set the image from the cache; and (b) if not found, retrieve the image asynchronously updating cache and cell appropriately, e.g.:

- (UICollectionViewCell *)collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *cellIdentifier = @"Cell";
    OthersCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:cellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];
    UIImageView *imageInCell = (UIImageView*)[cell viewWithTag:1];

    NSString *cacheKey = filenames[indexPath.item];
    imageInCell.image = [self.imageCache objectForKey:cacheKey];

    if (imageInCell.image == nil) {
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
            UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:filenames[indexPath.item]];
            if (image) {
                [self.imageCache setObject:image forKey:cacheKey];
                dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                    OthersCell *updateCell = (id)[collectionView cellForItemAtIndexPath:indexPath];
                    UIImageView *imageInCell = (UIImageView*)[updateCell viewWithTag:1];
                    imageInCell.image = image;
                });
            }
        });
    }

    return cell;
}

And, obviously, make sure you purge the cache if you receive memory warnings (in iOS 7, the cache doesn't always automatically purge itself under pressure like it used to do):

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];

    [self.imageCache removeAllObjects];
}
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Hi, Thanks for answering just few questions. I get eight errors in the index path. For example use of undeclared identifier cell, use of undeclared identifier Custom Cell,use of undeclared identifier updatecell,Property objects not found on object of type OthersViewController. –  user3001507 Nov 17 '13 at 16:57
    
@user3001507 Those were just my sample custom cell class names and properties, but I've updated my answer to use your variable/class names. By the way, one of the advantages of using custom cell subclasses as you can eliminate that viewWithTag stuff, by hooking you IBOutlet into the custom cell class. But I've added the unnecessary viewWithTag code back in to make it easier for you to read. –  Rob Nov 17 '13 at 17:05
    
Yes Ive noticed that you replaced my allImagesArray. So filenames is an array? –  user3001507 Nov 17 '13 at 17:08
    
Thanks Im almost there. I am getting an error saying Property customImage not found on object of type othercell and Property customImage not found on object of type OthersViewController –  user3001507 Nov 17 '13 at 17:18
    
I still can't get rid of the Property customImage not found on object of type OthersViewController –  user3001507 Nov 17 '13 at 17:22
- (UICollectionViewCell *)collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView
    cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath

This is the method in which you should be loading the images.

In viewDidLoad, I'd build the array of NSString file paths to each image, then I'd use the collectionView:cellForItemAtIndexPath: method to load the image from the specific file path for this particular cell.

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Ah, you beat me to it! Just wrote about the same answer ;-) –  Leijonien Nov 17 '13 at 15:39

In viewDidLoad You could just load a list of available images. So remove the for loop: for(NSString *str in directoryContent) { ... } loop there (EDIT: or make it a simple for loop, just to populate an array with filenames for the files having data).

When you update a specific collectionviewcell in collectionView:cellForItemAtIndexPath:, just load the image (only 1). The cell will now hold the image data instead of your view controller. So when the cell is released, so is the image data.

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for(NSString *str in directoryContent) { ... } is the loop in which he's loading a list of available images. He doesn't need to gut this entire loop... –  nhgrif Nov 17 '13 at 15:38
    
No, the list is already there before the loop starts in directoryContent. He's loading the images in the loop, so he should move that logic to the delegate method and forget the whole loop in viewDidLoad! –  Leijonien Nov 17 '13 at 15:43
    
Oh, yea, I see. –  nhgrif Nov 17 '13 at 15:45
    
Well, after a better look, it seems you are actually right. Because he's filtering out files without data, he might need the loop with just 1 if statement to populate the array. –  Leijonien Nov 17 '13 at 15:48
    
Hi,Thanks for answering!I am getting really confused because I am new to iOS I have posted my line for the indexpath. Also I don't really get your answer. sorry.. –  user3001507 Nov 17 '13 at 16:17

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