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Some background first (not crucial, skip to next paragraph if you like): I have to write a piece of software to demonstrate an FFT algorithm (as part of a uni project). I ask the user to choose either a mix of sines and cosines or a rectangular function, ask the user for the necessary parameters, generate the function (in a complex array, real components in 0, 2... and imaginary in 1, 3...), pad the data with zeros up to the next integer power of 2, pass it to an FFT function (currently just copied from Numerical Recipes in C, will look for something better once my program works!) and then I print to text files.

Everything goes great, apart from my print function:

int printToFile (double* array, unsigned long pointNum, int eqnNo)
{
double f, df;
FILE *outputReal, *outputImag;
/*Open files of different names depending on which function was generated*/
if(eqnNo == 1)
{
    outputReal = fopen("refft1.txt", "w");
    outputImag = fopen("imfft1.txt", "w");
    f = 0;
    df = 1/DX;
}
else
{
    outputReal = fopen("refft2.txt", "w");
    outputImag = fopen("imfft2.txt", "w");
    f = 0;
    df = 1/DT;
}
printf("Checking if stuff opened correctl...y\n");
/*Check the file pointers*/
if(!outputReal)
{
    printf("couldnt open file!\n");
    perror("Error: ");
    fclose(outputReal);
    free(array);
    array = NULL;
    exit(1);
}
if(!outputImag)
{
    printf("couldnt open file!\n");
    perror("Error: ");
    fclose(outputImag);
    free(array);
    array = NULL;
    exit(1);
}
printf("Stuff opened!\n");

int j, i;

/*Print array elements to each file on the fly*/
for(i=0, j=1; i<pointNum; i++)
{
    if(j > 0)/*real*/
    {
        /*printf("%G %G\n", f, array[i]);*/
        fprintf(outputReal, "%G %G\n", f, array[i]);
    }
    else/*imaginary*/
    {
        fprintf(outputImag, "%G %G\n", f, array[i]);
        /*printf("%G %G\n", f, array[i]);*/
        f += df;
    }
    j *= -1;
}

fclose(outputReal);
fclose(outputImag);
} 

it gets to where it should fprintf to file and the program just stalls (file opens without errors). If I replace the fprintfs with printfs, it prints out the transformed array elements happily. If I just don't call the FFT function in main and print the padded user-generated function, it will print to file no problem.

Can anybody suggest what I might be doing wrong? My guess is that either my print function is doing something bad, or by calling the FFT I'm screwing something up which means fprintf wont work (copied straight from NRiC, changed floats to doubles for now). Don't want to post my whole code here (currently 430 lines), but i have callocs in the function generators and reallocs for reading user input from the console which might also be problematic, though I have checked them and that wouldn't explain why it only breaks after the FFT. Help will be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Wellcome to SO. This is not a site for code review. In cases as yours only you can answer it, anyhow: use a debugger and he'll tell you where things go wrong. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 17 '13 at 16:39
    
That code looks ok to me except that the perror()'s when fopen fails won't print anything useful. To be useful, they would have to come right after the fopen(). You problem is somewhere else. Maybe a memory corruption error that is overwriting your file pointers. –  Charlie Burns Nov 17 '13 at 16:42
1  
Running valgrind might shed some light on it. –  Charlie Burns Nov 17 '13 at 16:45
    
Ah sorry, have refrained from posting here so many times but this was really annoying me! Anyway, found some other FFT algorithm (based on NRiC but already in double precision) and replaced the old FFT function with the new one, everything runs fine. It would make sense, the FFT is magic as far as I'm concerned and I could easily have copied code that was destroying my program. Anyway, this is fixed, thanks for your comments. –  user2738009 Nov 17 '13 at 21:12

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