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I'm trying to use Jsch to establish an SSH connection in Java. My code produces the following exception:

com.jcraft.jsch.JSchException: UnknownHostKey: mywebsite.com. 
RSA key fingerprint is 22:fb:ee:fe:18:cd:aa:9a:9c:78:89:9f:b4:78:75:b4

I cannot find how to verify the host key in the Jsch documentation. I have included my code below.

import com.jcraft.jsch.JSch;
import com.jcraft.jsch.Session;

public class ssh{
  public static void main(String[] arg){

    try{
       JSch jsch = new JSch();

       //create SSH connection
       String host = "mywebsite.com";
       String user = "username";
       String password = "123456";

       Session session = jsch.getSession(user, host, 22);
       session.setPassword(password);
       session.connect();

     }
     catch(Exception e){
       System.out.println(e);
    } 
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Try to shut down sshd on your *nix host, and start a single thread in the foreground: /usr/sbin/sshd -d This will give you a lot of debugging info from the sshd side. –  user327584 Apr 28 '10 at 7:30
    
@AmmSokun everyone has been able to solve this problem. See the answers. –  bmargulies Dec 25 '12 at 13:41

10 Answers 10

up vote 84 down vote accepted

I would either:

  1. Try to ssh from the command line and accept the public key (the host will be added to ~/.ssh/known_hosts and everything should then work fine from Jsch) -OR-
  2. Configure JSch to not use "StrictHostKeyChecking" (this introduces insecurities and should only be used for testing purposes), using the following code:

    java.util.Properties config = new java.util.Properties(); 
    config.put("StrictHostKeyChecking", "no");
    session.setConfig(config);
    

Option #1 (adding the host to the ~/.ssh/known_hosts file) has my preference.

share|improve this answer
8  
JSch#setConfig("StrictHostKeyChecking", "no") will do the same job, but in just one line –  yegor256 Mar 31 '12 at 4:32
    
Side note: I used this feedback to configure my ~/.ssh/config file to fix the above error when I didn't have access to modify the source code –  Adam Rofer Apr 4 '12 at 21:03
    
What did you do to your .ssh/config? I'm having the same error. –  Bernard Aug 11 '12 at 18:39
5  
This is insecure and really shouldn't have been selected as the right answer on that principle. The setKnownHosts() and setFingerPrint() options are the way to do this without ignoring an important aspect of the ssh process. Edit: in my experience, #1 does not work from within some IDE environments like Eclipse. –  Rondo Jul 11 '13 at 1:05

You can also simply do

session.setConfig("StrictHostKeyChecking", "no");
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1  
While this code may help answer the question, code only answers are not high quality. A better answer would explain what the code does, tell where to insert it, explain why this approach was taken, and link to relevant documentation. –  Stephen Ostermiller Jun 20 at 10:02
JSch jsch = new JSch();
Session session = null;`enter code here`
try {
session = jsch.getSession("user", "hostname", 22); // default
UserInfo ui = new MyUserInfo();
session.setUserInfo(ui);
session.setPassword("password".getBytes());
java.util.Properties config = new java.util.Properties();
config.put("StrictHostKeyChecking", "no");
session.setConfig(config);
session.connect();
Channel channel = session.openChannel("sftp");
channel.connect();
System.out.println("Connected");
} catch (JSchException e) {
e.printStackTrace(System.out);
} catch (Exception e) {
e.printStackTrace(System.out);
} finally {
session.disconnect();
System.out.println("Disconnected");
}
}
share|improve this answer

setting known host is better than setting fingure print value.

When you set known host, try to manually ssh (very first time, before application runs) from the box the application runs.

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Depending on what program you use for ssh, the way to get the proper key could vary. Putty (popular with Windows) uses their own format for ssh keys. With most variants of Linux and BSD that I've seen, you just have to look in ~/.ssh/known_hosts. I usually ssh from a Linux machine and then copy this file to a Windows machine. Then I use something similar to

jsch.setKnownHosts("C:\\Users\\cabbott\\known_hosts");

Assuming I have placed the file in C:\Users\cabbott on my Windows machine. If you don't have access to a Linux machine, try http://www.cygwin.com/

Maybe someone else can suggest another Windows alternative. I find putty's way of handling SSH keys by storing them in the registry in a non-standard format bothersome to extract.

share|improve this answer

You can also execute the following code. It is tested and working.

import com.jcraft.jsch.Channel;
import com.jcraft.jsch.JSch;
import com.jcraft.jsch.JSchException;
import com.jcraft.jsch.Session;
import com.jcraft.jsch.UIKeyboardInteractive;
import com.jcraft.jsch.UserInfo;

public class SFTPTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JSch jsch = new JSch();
        Session session = null;
        try {
            session = jsch.getSession("username", "mywebsite.com", 22); //default port is 22
            UserInfo ui = new MyUserInfo();
            session.setUserInfo(ui);
            session.setPassword("123456".getBytes());
            session.connect();
            Channel channel = session.openChannel("sftp");
            channel.connect();
            System.out.println("Connected");
        } catch (JSchException e) {
            e.printStackTrace(System.out);
        } catch (Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace(System.out);
        } finally{
            session.disconnect();
            System.out.println("Disconnected");
        }
    }

    public static class MyUserInfo implements UserInfo, UIKeyboardInteractive {

        @Override
        public String getPassphrase() {
            return null;
        }
        @Override
        public String getPassword() {
            return null;
        }
        @Override
        public boolean promptPassphrase(String arg0) {
            return false;
        }
        @Override
        public boolean promptPassword(String arg0) {
            return false;
        }
        @Override
        public boolean promptYesNo(String arg0) {
            return false;
        }
        @Override
        public void showMessage(String arg0) {
        }
        @Override
        public String[] promptKeyboardInteractive(String arg0, String arg1,
                String arg2, String[] arg3, boolean[] arg4) {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Please substitute the appropriate values.

share|improve this answer
    
setFingerprint method not found... –  Zon Aug 1 '13 at 11:11
    
Yes, I had added that for my reference. I will remove that. Thanks. –  Vishnu Prasad Kallummel Aug 18 '13 at 4:49

Has anyone been able to solve this problem? I am using Jscp to scp files using public key authentication (i dont want to use password authentication). Help will be appreciated!!!

This stackoverflow entry is about the host-key checking, and there is no relation to the public key authentication.

As for the public key authentication, try the following sample with your plain(non ciphered) private key,

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Just substitute "user", "pass", "SSHD_IP". And create a file called known_hosts.txt with the content of the server's ~/.ssh/known_hosts. You will get a shell.

public class Known_Hosts {
public static void main(String[] arg) {
    try {
        JSch jsch = new JSch();
        jsch.setKnownHosts("known_hosts.txt");
        Session session = jsch.getSession("user", "SSHD_IP", 22);
        session.setPassword("pass");
        session.connect();
        Channel channel = session.openChannel("shell");
        channel.setInputStream(System.in);
        channel.setOutputStream(System.out);
        channel.connect();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }
  }
}
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It is a security risk to avoid host key checking.

JSch uses HostKeyRepository interface and its default implementation KnownHosts class to manage this. You can provide an alternate implementation that allows specific keys by implementing HostKeyRepository. Or you could keep the keys that you want to allow in a file in the known_hosts format and call

jsch.setKnownHosts(knownHostsFileName);

This would be a more secure solution.

Jsch is open source and you can download the source from here. In the examples folder, look for KnownHosts.java to know more details.

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Add that host to ~/.ssh/known_hosts.

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