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I'm working on a c++ project, and we recently needed to include a small part of boost in it. The boost part is really minimal (Boost::Python), thus, using bjam to build everything looks like an overkill (besides, everyone working on the project feels comfortable with make, and has no knowloedge of jam).

I made quite some tests already, but I cant find a way to include the formerly mentioned library in my makefile and make the build succesful.

All your help is deeply apreciated. :)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I had the same problem and found a solution in this tutorial. You 1) need to compile the source into an object file with the -fPIC gcc option, and 2) compile this object into a library with the -shared gcc option. Of course you have also to link against the Boost.Python library (generally -lboost_python, however for my debian system it is for example -lboost_python-mt-py25, I have also to add -I/usr/include/pythyon25). In my makefile I end up doing those two steps in one command. See also p. 13 of this presentation.

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Thank you. This was exactly the answer I was looking for. :) –  Fabzter Jan 13 '10 at 17:19

If you're uncomfortable with bjam, you might want to consider using Boost.Cmake.
Alternatively you should at least be able to see more easily what they are doing then with the bjam files.

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Run bjam from the makefile, just for building that part

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You can use Boost's bcp utility to extract only the subset of Boost you need. That will minimize your build time & size.

That doesn't answer your question, though. You may want to consider building the Boost.Python libraries separately and checking them directly into your source control system. Then nobody would need to build them.

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