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So, I have a hero structure that contains name, health, and attack. I'm allowing the user to enter how many heroes they want to create and create an array of that many heroes (I also had problems allowing the user to determine the array size, so the problem could be there). When trying to set the attributes using a loop of the array, I get an error: IntelliSense: no operator "[]" matches these operands. operand types are: Hero [ int ]

My question is, how do I loop through an array of a structures to set their attributes and if so, would displaying the hero's information be similar with a display function?

struct Hero
{
private: 
    string hName;
    int hHealth;
    int hAttack;

public:
    void displayHeroData();
    void setName(string);
    void setHealth(int);
    void setAttack(int);
};

void Hero::displayHeroData()
{
cout << "\n\n\n\nHERO INFO:\n" << endl;
cout << "Name: " << hName << endl;
cout << "Health: " << hHealth << endl;
cout << "Attack: " << hAttack << endl;
};

void Hero::setName(string name)
{
hName = name;
}

void Hero::setHealth(int health)
{
if(health > 0)
    hHealth = health;
else
    hHealth = 100;
}

void Hero::setAttack(int attack)
{
if(attack > 0)
    hAttack = attack;
else
    hAttack = 100;
}

int main()
{
string name;
int health;
int attack;
int num;
Hero *heroList; //declaring array

      //getting size of array
cout << "How many hero's do you want to create? (greater than 0)" <<endl;
cin >> num;
heroList = new Hero[num]; //this is the array of Heroes

      //looping through the array
for(int x = 0; x < num; ++x){

      //creating a new hero, I think???
Hero heroList[x];

      //setting hero's name
cout << "What is hero" << x <<"'s name?" << endl;
cin >> name;
heroList[x].setName(name);

      //display the character after attributes have been set
heroList[x].displayCharacterData();

      }//end of for loop


return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
Hero heroList[x];

Remove this line for good. no need for it.

share|improve this answer
    
It is an error actually. –  CroCo Nov 17 '13 at 20:34
    
does removing it work. or you got runtime error? –  hasan Nov 17 '13 at 20:35
    
This worked and allowed me to loop through! Thank you! –  user1368970 Nov 17 '13 at 20:38
    
How did it work? You did reinitialize the array (heroList) with a size which is not constant. –  CroCo Nov 17 '13 at 20:54
    
The answer says that this line should be removed. –  hasan Nov 17 '13 at 20:58

The only problem that you will encounter after removing the line proposed (Hero heroList[x]) is that all the hero objects created aren't initialized (when you called new Hero[num] you only allocated the array and created the default implicit constructor for each one).

In order to init all of them, you must either use all your 'setters', or write a non-default constructor and then only allocate an array of Hero* ptrs, and when looping through it init each ptr to a new Hero(.....) with the parameters you wish.

Hope that helps clarify things.

share|improve this answer

In the loop just do the following

  //looping through the array
    for(int x = 0; x < num; ++x)
    {
        cout << "What is hero" << x <<"'s name?" << endl;
        cin >> name;
        heroList[x].setName(name);
    }

    for(int x = 0; x < num; ++x)
    {
        heroList[x].displayHeroData();
    }
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