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For the following switch statement:

if a value between 0-9 is selected, output is fine. If value greater than 9 is selected, output is always a lowercase z.

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        random[i] = randomnumber.nextInt(36);
        if (random[i] > 9)
        {
            switch(random [i])
            {
            case 10: character[i] = "A";
            case 11: character[i] = "B";
            case 12: character[i] = "C";
            case 13: character[i] = "D";
            case 14: character[i] = "E";
            case 15: character[i] = "F";
            case 16: character[i] = "G";
            case 17: character[i] = "H";
            case 18: character[i] = "I";
            case 19: character[i] = "J";
            case 20: character[i] = "K";
            case 21: character[i] = "L";
            case 22: character[i] = "M";
            case 23: character[i] = "N";
            case 24: character[i] = "O";
            case 25: character[i] = "P";
            case 26: character[i] = "Q";
            case 27: character[i] = "R";
            case 28: character[i] = "S";
            case 29: character[i] = "T";
            case 30: character[i] = "U";
            case 31: character[i] = "V";
            case 32: character[i] = "W";
            case 33: character[i] = "X";
            case 34: character[i] = "Y";
            case 35: character[i] = "Z";
            }
        }
        else
            character[i] = Integer.toString(random[i]);
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marked as duplicate by Sotirios Delimanolis, EJP, Desolator, Dennis Meng, Grzegorz Żur Feb 28 at 19:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
Add break statements in each case. –  ZouZou Nov 17 '13 at 21:15
3  
You could achieve the same result easier by doing a little addition with character values, by the way! :) –  kviiri Nov 17 '13 at 21:17
    
What a silly mistake! -1: Your code WON"T COMPILE in Java. –  Desolator Nov 17 '13 at 21:18
    
@Desolator, care to elaborate? Even though it is obviously semantically incorrect I fail to see any issue with the syntax. –  kviiri Nov 17 '13 at 21:40
1  
@Desolator You're wrong. My compiler compiles the code just fine without any breaks, and there's no reason why it shouldn't because the specification doesn't mention breaks being necessary for switch-cases to work. –  kviiri Nov 17 '13 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A case statement is a form of standidised goto statement, it goes to the case statement and then continues on as usual. To get the behaviour you desire you need a

break;

at the end of each case

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Add break with all case blocks like

case 10: 
  character[i] = "A";
  break;
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Where is the break of the cases man!

switch(random[i]){
 case 10: ....
  break;
 case 11: ....
  break;
 //and so on
}
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