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I am trying to program the Enigma Coding Machine. I have managed to get the rotors and reflector working fine but am trying to work out the rotor advances.

For anyone not familiar with this. An Enigma Machine consists of 3 rotors which are substitution ciphers and a reflector which contains 13 pairs of characters. To encode a character it is first encoded by the first rotor, then the encoded character from this is passed to the second rotor and then so on through one more rotor to a reflector which swaps this new character with the one it is paired with. This paired character is then encoded in reverse back the opposite way through the rotors until you end up with a final encoded character.

Before an individual character is encoded the rotors are shifted. If you had a very long message, before anything is encoded the first rotor is shifted one place, this character is then passed through the system and encoded. Then before the second character is encoded the first rotor is shifted again. The rotor is continually shifted until it reaches the start again. After the 25th character has been encoded, the first rotor reaches where it started from but now the second rotor shifts one place. The first rotor then turns another 26 times before the second rotor turns again. When the second rotor has turned 26 times the third rotor turns once. This keeps happening until 25 25 25 is reached at which point they reset back to 0 0 0 and the cycle starts again. This kind of reminds me of a clock divided into hours, minutes and seconds where the seconds are turning continually the minutes slower and the hours very slow.

I know this can probably be programmed with modular arithmetic but I cannot see how? So any help would be greatly appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

From the machine's point of view, a rotor is two things:

  • It is a function from a symbol to another symbol
  • It can step forward to be another function

We could write a type for it that is something like:

newtype Symbol = Symbol {representation :: Int}

data Rotor = Rotor {
    transformation :: Symbol -> Symbol,
    next :: Rotor
}

If the machine knows about the symmetry from the reflection, it might be something like

data Rotor = Rotor {
    forward :: Symbol -> Symbol,
    backward :: Symbol -> Symbol,
    next :: Rotor
}

(You could also use something like [(Symbol -> Symbol,Symbol -> Symbol)])

Now, how do we construct a Rotor? Let's get the definition of an example rotor, IC.

rotorICdefinition = map symbol $ "DMTWSILRUYQNKFEJCAZBPGXOHV"

Now, symbol needs to have type Char -> Symbol. Something like this should do.

symbol :: Char -> Symbol
symbol x = Symbol $ ord x - ord 'A'

There's a bunch of magic in ord. It knows what order the alphabet comes in already. For example:

Prelude Data.Char> map ord "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
[65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73,74,75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90]

Next, we'd like to be able to make a rotor from its definition

rotorIC :: Rotor
rotorIC = makeRotor rotorICdefinition

So makeRotor should have the type

makeRotor :: [Symbol] -> Rotor

We can define it as

makeRotor definition = makeRotor' 0
    where
        makeRotor' steps = Rotor {
            forward = forwardLookup steps,
            backward =  reverseLookup steps,
            next = makeRotor' ((steps+1) `mod` symbolModulus)
        }
        forwardLookupTable = array (minBound, maxBound) (zip symbols definition)
        reverseLookupTable = array (minBound, maxBound) (zip definition symbols)
        forwardLookup = lookup forwardLookupTable
        reverseLookup = lookup reverseLookupTable
        lookup lookupTable steps = (lookupTable !) . Symbol . (`mod` symbolModulus) . (+ steps) . representation 

A lot is happening here. We're making an infinite stream of rotors, each one rotated one step from the previous one, starting with a rotor that's been rotatated 0 steps. steps in makeRotor' is keeping track of how many steps its been rotated. The Rotor consists of both forward and backward transformations, which take into account how many steps the rotor has been rotated. The next rotor is the same, but has been rotates one more step. To keep from eventually overflowing an integer, we take its modulus mod the number of symbols that exist, symbolModulus. (There are more efficient ways to do that). The two lookups are based on lookup tables that are built once, mapping every symbol in the range (minBound, maxBound) to what it should be according to the definition. The lookup itself is just take the input, add the number of steps, take that modulus the number of symbols, and return what's in that position in the lookup table.

This requires that we define the newly appearing minBound, maxBound, symbols, and symbolModulus:

instance Bounded (Symbol) where
    minBound = symbol 'A'
    maxBound = symbol 'Z' 

symbolModulus = (representation maxBound) - (representation minBound) + 1

-- This could have some other definition
symbols = map symbol $ "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"

We'll add a little UI, and put the whole program together:

module Main (
    main
) where

import Data.Char
import Data.Array -- requires array package
import System.IO

main = go rotorIC
    where go rotor = do
            putStr "Input   : "
            hFlush stdout
            command <- getLine
            case command of
                "next" -> go (next rotor)
                [] -> return ()
                text -> case all (inRange (char minBound, char maxBound)) text of
                    True -> do
                        putStrLn . ("Forward : " ++) $ map (char . forward rotor . symbol) text
                        putStrLn . ("Backward: " ++)$ map (char . backward rotor . symbol) text
                        go rotor
                    _ -> do
                        putStrLn "Not all of the input was symbols"
                        go rotor 


newtype Symbol = Symbol {representation :: Int} deriving (Eq, Ord, Ix)

symbol :: Char -> Symbol
symbol x = Symbol $ ord x - ord 'A'

char :: Symbol -> Char
char x = chr $ representation x + ord 'A' 

instance Bounded (Symbol) where
    minBound = symbol 'A'
    maxBound = symbol 'Z' 

symbolModulus = (representation maxBound) - (representation minBound) + 1

-- This could have some other definition 
symbols = map symbol $ "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"

data Rotor = Rotor {
    forward :: Symbol -> Symbol,
    backward :: Symbol -> Symbol,
    next :: Rotor
}


rotorICdefinition = map symbol $ "DMTWSILRUYQNKFEJCAZBPGXOHV"

rotorIC :: Rotor
rotorIC = makeRotor rotorICdefinition

makeRotor :: [Symbol] -> Rotor

makeRotor definition = makeRotor' 0
    where
        makeRotor' steps = Rotor {
            forward = forwardLookup steps,
            backward =  reverseLookup steps,
            next = makeRotor' ((steps+1) `mod` symbolModulus)
        }
        forwardLookupTable = array (minBound, maxBound) (zip symbols definition)
        reverseLookupTable = array (minBound, maxBound) (zip definition symbols)
        forwardLookup = lookup forwardLookupTable
        reverseLookup = lookup reverseLookupTable
        lookup lookupTable steps = (lookupTable !) . Symbol . (`mod` symbolModulus) . (+ steps) . representation 

Now we can run through a few examples. The forward transformation of the first six letters of the alphabet is the start of our rotorICdefinition:

Input   : ABCDEFG
Forward : DMTWSIL
Backward: RTQAONV

If we put in the start of the rotorICdefinition, we get back the first six letters of the alphabet as the backward transformation:

Input   : DMTWSIL
Forward : WKBXZUN
Backward: ABCDEFG

If we go to the next step on the rotor, we get something very different:

Input   : next
Input   : ABCDEFG
Forward : MTWSILR
Backward: TQAONVY

But if we put in letters starting one before 'A', we get back our definition again:

Input   : ZABCDEF
Forward : DMTWSIL
Backward: RTQAONV

After going to the next step on the rotor 25 more times, we are back where we started:

Input   : next
(25 times total)
Input   : next
Input   : ABCDEFG
Forward : DMTWSIL
Backward: RTQAONV
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You need to test each of the rotor separately (or you can compose a convoluted expression to update them all at once but this is not readable):

type RotorState = (Int, Int, Int)

nextState :: RotorState -> RotorState
nextState (x, y, z)
  | x == 25 && y == 25 && z == 25 = (0, 0, 0)
  | y == 25 && z == 25 = (x + 1, 0, 0)
  | z == 25 = (x, y + 1, 0)
  | otherwise = (x, y, z+ 1)

To use, you would have a function like:

actUponRotor :: RotorState -> (RotorState, a)
actUponRotor r = (nextState r, undefined)

Where undefined stands for the computation to be done on current rotor position (outputting a single character or receiving one)

If you don't like to carry the state around explicitely, you might want to use the State monad like in:

actUponRotor' :: State RotorState a
actUponRotor' = do
  changeRotorState
  return undefined

changeRotorState :: State RotorState ()
changeRotorState = modify nextState
share|improve this answer
    
This is describing how the machine could keep track of when to rotate each rotor. Note that this rule could be completely independent of the rotors themselves, and how large those rotors are. Another similarly constructed machine could do something different like advance the first rotor 3 steps, the second rotor 5 steps, and the third rotor 7 steps between each character. –  Cirdec Nov 17 '13 at 23:56
    
Clearly. But this can still be solved with a nextState, prevState pair of functions :) –  Mihai Maruseac Nov 17 '13 at 23:59

You could use Haskell's generic equivalent of a counter in an imperative language.

Say you have some imperative code

def f(x) {
c = 0 ;

while ( c<k ) {
    x = g(x,c) ;
    c +=1; 

return z(x);
}

Haskell version would be

f x = f' 0 x where f' k x = z x ; f _ x = f (_+1) (g x ) 

so you could have the position of the rotors as an internal argument like that.

You could maybe also use pattern matching.

RotorState = (Int,Int,Int)
turnRotor :: RotorState ->RotorState
turnRotor (25, 25 , 25    )  = (0  , 0 ,  0)
turnRotor (_ , 25 , 25    )  = (_+1, 0 ,  0)
turnRotor (_ , __ , 25    )  = (_  , __+1,0)
turnRotor (_ , __  , ___  )  = (_  , __, ___+1)

Have fun! I hope this is helpful at all.

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1  
I tried to transform your "Haskell version" to something that's actual valid Haskell, but couldn't figure out what the precise equivalent of your imperative pseudocode is supposed to be. I think your intention might be quite good and substantial, but please add some type signatures etc. so we know what you actually mean. One particular thing to note: in Haskell, _ can't be a parameter, it's a special wildcard pattern to match anything that's thrown away. –  leftaroundabout Nov 17 '13 at 22:04

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