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max' :: Int -> Int -> Int
max' a b = if a >= b then a else b 

you see that the function is correct but if i write

let a = 3,
let b = 3

and also if i write

ghci> a == b => True

so it compares them then why it doesn't compare in my function

ghci> max' a b 

error occurs why? or what is the right way to write it?

Sorry I am beginner if my question is silly forgive me for that and edit it if there is a need for that Thanks

<interactive>:19:6:
    Couldn't match expected type `Int' with actual type `Integer'
    In the first argument of max', namely `a'
    In the expression: max' a b
    In an equation for `it': it = max' a b

<interactive>:19:8:
    Couldn't match expected type `Int' with actual type `Integer'
    In the second argument of max', namely `b'
    In the expression: max' a b
    In an equation for `it': it = max' a b
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2  
What error do you get? –  Paul Manta Nov 17 '13 at 21:58
    
here it is <interactive>:19:6: Couldn't match expected type Int' with actual type Integer' In the first argument of max', namely a' In the expression: max' a b In an equation for it': it = max' a b <interactive>:19:8: Couldn't match expected type Int' with actual type Integer' In the second argument of max', namely b' In the expression: max' a b In an equation for it': it = max' a b –  user2999428 Nov 17 '13 at 22:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I guess you are doing this in the ghci interpreter. Then, have a look at (:t displays the type of an expression and a line of the form a :: t means a has type t):

Prelude> let a = 3
Prelude> :t a
a :: Integer

The ghci interpreter commits early and gives a the type Integer though it should give any numeric type (thus a :: Num t => t).

Now, your function receives Ints as arguments but since a and b are Integers you get that error message.

You can either remove the restrictive type signature or you can define a and b to be Ints. I'd go with the first option, unless there is some requirement to go with Int-only type signature. To do so you need to add ::Int at the end of the definition:

Prelude> let b = 42 :: Int
Prelude> :t b
b :: Int

If you want to remove the signature recode your function to have only one line:

max' a b = if a >= b then a else b 

Now, if you're to inspect its type:

Prelude> :t max'
max' :: Ord a => a -> a -> a

Which means you've got a generic function which works for any type which can be ordered.

An alternative is to start ghci using an extension: ghci -XNoMonomorphismRestriction. In this case:

Prelude> let a = 3
Prelude> :t a
a :: Num a => a

which will work directly on your function.

The reason why ghci without this extension commits to Integer is the Monomorphism restriction

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1  
You can also :set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction inside GHCi. –  Jon Purdy Nov 18 '13 at 5:34

When you use let a = 3, the type of a will be Integer, not Int. You can check this by using :t a in ghci. You can use let a = 3 :: Int to ensure that you get the correct type:

ghci>let a = 3 :: Int
ghci>let b = 3 :: Int
ghci>max' a b 
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Why it becomes integer not int directly? and what are the differences between prelude or ghci? –  user2999428 Nov 17 '13 at 22:13
2  
If you don't explicitly annotate, the compiler has to make a choice. Choosing Integer here is a choice as good as any. –  gspr Nov 17 '13 at 22:30
2  
GHCi is GHC's interactive interpreter. Prelude is just a standard module that's always implicitly imported. It is what gives you functions such as >= that you have in your code above. –  gspr Nov 17 '13 at 22:33
3  
@gspr It does not have to choose. Since all integer literals have an implicit fromInteger to them ghci could keep it as a general Num a => a value. –  kqr Nov 18 '13 at 9:04
1  
@kqr: Ah, yes, I agree. That was imprecise of me. @user2999428: Well, all the other integral types (such as Int) have limited range. I'm only speculating now, but I guess it's kinda nice that the chosen type can handle any integer you enter (given enough memory)? –  gspr Nov 18 '13 at 10:51

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