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I have 2 class, I would like to pass a method from one to other by callback!

See that I also wish to hold the address of this method using void (*callBack)();

I'm used to do this in C, but I dont know how to do this in c++;

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
    private:
        void (*callBack)(); //to hold the address of the method

    public:
        A();
        void setCallBack(void(*cB)());
        void useCallBack();
};


A::A()
{

}

void A::setCallBack(void(*cB)())
{
    callBack = cB;
}

void A::useCallBack()
{
    callBack();
}


class B
{
    private:
        A * Aguy;

    public:
        B();
        void someMethod();
        void otherMethod();
};

B::B()
{
    Aguy = new A();
}

void B::otherMethod()
{
    Aguy->setCallBack(someMethod);
    Aguy->useCallBack()
}

void B::someMethod()
{
    cout << "Hello. I'm from class b" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    B Bguy;
    Bguy.otherMethod();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Check std::function. –  cyrus Nov 17 '13 at 23:11
    
look at en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/bind and it's examples. –  goldcode Nov 17 '13 at 23:36
    
Its not usual to see callback functions in C++. You normally define an interface with virtual methods. Then pass an object that implements the interface. Your object can then use the interface object. If you really want callback function then std::function<> provides an abstraction method around generic functions that include functions/methods/functors. –  Loki Astari Nov 18 '13 at 0:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See c++ - <unresolved overloaded function type> for details.

To quote the answer:

In C++, member functions have an implicit parameter which points to the object (the this pointer inside the member function). Normal C functions can be thought of as having a different calling convention from member functions, so the types of their pointers (pointer-to-member-function vs pointer-to-function) are different and incompatible. C++ introduces a new type of pointer, called a pointer-to-member, which can be invoked only by providing an object.

Put static on someMethod:

class B
{
    private:
        A * Aguy;

    public:
        B();
        static void someMethod();
        void otherMethod();
};

void B::otherMethod() {
    Aguy->setCallBack(B::someMethod);
    Aguy->useCallBack(); // adding missing semicolon
}
share|improve this answer
    
Okey, you solved my problem, thank you. But now I have antoher one! See that I'm trying to use C object inside someMethod! class C { private: public: C(); void Cmethod(); }; void C::Cmethod() { cout << "Hi. I'm from C class" << endl; } class B { private: A * Aguy; C * Cguy; public: B(); static void someMethod(); void otherMethod(); }; B::B() { Aguy = new A(); Cguy = new C(); } void B::someMethod() { Cguy->Cmethod(); cout << "Hello. I'm from class B" << endl; } int main() { B Bguy; Bguy.otherMethod(); return 0; } –  user2638146 Nov 17 '13 at 23:54
    
@user2638146 Post it as a different question. –  user1508519 Nov 17 '13 at 23:57

The problem is that:

    void (*callBack)();

This is not a pointer to a method. This is a pointer to a function.
To have a pointer to a method you need to specify the class the method is in.

    void (B::*callBack)();

Then when you call it you need to call it via an object.

 void A::useCallBack(B* b)
 {
      (b->*callBack)();
 }

But this is probably not what you want.
What you really want is a wrapper that encapsulates all this.

I would take a look at std::function. This will allow you to wrap a method call and an object into a single object that you can then call.

std::function<void()>   callback;

Just replace all your occurrences of void(*cB)() with std::function<void()> then you can bind an instance of the object to the method at the call point.

Aguy->setCallBack(std::bind(&B::someMethod, this));

This also allows you to seemly pass any normal function or functor as a callback.

void print()
{    std:cout << "It worked\n";
}
...
Aguy->setCallBack(&print);

struct Printer
{
     void operator()() const
     {
         std::cout << "It worked with  obejct\n";
     }
}
...
Aguy->setCallBack(Printer());
share|improve this answer

If you need to pass member function pointers see the modified code. it uses modern c++ constructs.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;


class A
{
private:
    typedef std::function<void(void)> some_void_function_type;
    some_void_function_type f_;
public:
    A();
    void setCallBack(some_void_function_type f);
    void useCallBack();
};


A::A()
{

}

void A::setCallBack(some_void_function_type f)
{
    f_ = f;
}

void A::useCallBack()
{
    f_();
}


class B
{
private:
    A * Aguy;

public:
    B();
    void someMethod();
    void otherMethod();
};

B::B()
{
    Aguy = new A();
}

void B::otherMethod()
{
    Aguy->setCallBack(std::bind(&B::someMethod, this));
    Aguy->useCallBack();
}

void B::someMethod()
{
    cout << "Hello. I'm from class b" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    B Bguy;
    Bguy.otherMethod();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Prefer void() over void(void). You don't define your functions as void print(void) they are more naturally expressed as void print() so your function definitions should match. –  Loki Astari Nov 18 '13 at 0:06

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