Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to build a bash program that can read a file, like a *.bin and print all its hexadecimal numbers, as 'hex' editors do. Where I can start?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Edit: Added "bytestream" functionality. If the script name contains the word "stream" (e.g. it's a symlink such as ln -s bash-hexdump bash-hexdump-stream and run as ./bash-hexdump-stream), it will output a continuous stream of hex characters representing the contents of the file. Otherwise its output will look like hexdump -C.

It takes a bunch of trickery since Bash isn't really good at binary:

#!/bin/bash
# bash-hexdump
# by Dennis Williamson - 2010-01-04
# in response to http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2003803/show-hexadecimal-numbers-of-a-file
# usage: bash-hexdump file

if [[ -z "$1" ]]
then
    exec 3<&0                           # read stdin
    [[ -p /dev/stdin ]] || tty="yes"    # no pipe
else
    exec 3<"$1"            # read file
fi

# if the script name contains "stream" then output will be continuous hex digits
# like hexdump -ve '1/1 "%.2x"'
[[ $0 =~ stream ]] && nostream=false || nostream=true

saveIFS="$IFS"
IFS=""                     # disables interpretation of \t, \n and space
saveLANG="$LANG"
LANG=C                     # allows characters > 0x7F
bytecount=0
valcount=0
$nostream && printf "%08x  " $bytecount
while read -s -u 3 -d '' -r -n 1 char    # -d '' allows newlines, -r allows \
do
    ((bytecount++))
    printf -v val "%02x" "'$char"    # see below for the ' trick
    [[ "$tty" == "yes" && "$val" == "04" ]] && break    # exit on ^D
    echo -n "$val"
    $nostream && echo -n " "
    ((valcount++))
    if [[ "$val" < 20 || "$val" > 7e ]]
    then
        string+="."                  # show unprintable characters as a dot
    else
        string+=$char
    fi
    if $nostream && (( bytecount % 8 == 0 ))      # add a space down the middle
    then
        echo -n " "
    fi
    if (( bytecount % 16 == 0 ))   # print 16 values per line
    then
        $nostream && echo "|$string|"
        string=''
        valcount=0
        $nostream && printf "%08x  " $bytecount
    fi
done

if [[ "$string" != "" ]]            # if the last line wasn't full, pad it out
then
    length=${#string}
    if (( length > 7 ))
    then
        ((length--))
    fi
    (( length += (16 - valcount) * 3 + 4))
    $nostream && printf "%${length}s\n" "|$string|"
    $nostream && printf "%08x  " $bytecount
fi
$nostream && echo

LANG="$saveLANG";
IFS="$saveIFS"

The apostrophe trick is documented here. The relevant part says:

If the leading character is a single-quote or double-quote, the value shall be the numeric value in the underlying codeset of the character following the single-quote or double-quote.

Here is some output from the script showing the first few lines of my /bin/bash plus a few more:

00000000  7f 45 4c 46 01 01 01 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |.ELF............|
00000010  02 00 03 00 01 00 00 00  e0 1e 06 08 34 00 00 00  |............4...|
00000020  c4 57 0d 00 00 00 00 00  34 00 20 00 09 00 28 00  |.W......4. ...(.|
00000030  1d 00 1c 00 06 00 00 00  34 00 00 00 34 80 04 08  |........4...4...|
. . .
00000150  01 00 00 00 2f 6c 69 62  2f 6c 64 2d 6c 69 6e 75  |..../lib/ld-linu|
00000160  78 2e 73 6f 2e 32 00 00  04 00 00 00 10 00 00 00  |x.so.2..........|
00000170  01 00 00 00 47 4e 55 00  00 00 00 00 02 00 00 00  |....GNU.........|
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, the output format of this script is the same as hexdump -C or hd. –  Dennis Williamson Jan 5 '10 at 5:08
    
+1 for doing it in bash all the way. –  Alok Singhal Jan 5 '10 at 6:44
    
nice answer. +1. –  ithcy Jan 5 '10 at 20:37
1  
I was pleased to learn that a version of my script above was accepted to be distributed as an example script with Bash 4.2 (just released). –  Dennis Williamson Feb 15 '11 at 3:10
add comment

Use the od command,

od -t x1  filename

share|improve this answer
    
Is od a Linux program or a bash function? Sorry, I'm a really beginner. –  Nathan Campos Jan 5 '10 at 2:39
2  
@Nathan Campos: you can find out using which od, if you get the name of a program then it's an external program (for od, it probably is). –  Greg Hewgill Jan 5 '10 at 2:46
3  
pretty standard in unixes, been around since the dawn of time. –  GregS Jan 5 '10 at 3:00
add comment

You could use od. "od -x file" Why reinvent that wheel?

share|improve this answer
add comment

you can also use hexdump if you have it

hexdump -x /usr/bin/binaryfile
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.