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I have the following code:

private class Record {
    float val;
    byte year;
}
....
Record[] record=new Record[100];
record[0].year=(byte)12;

I got exception on the last line. Thanks!

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There is no Record object in the array. It's an array of references that can be set to point to Record objects, but you have to create the objects. –  Hot Licks Nov 18 '13 at 2:05
    
possible duplicate of NullPointerException while filling an array –  Quincunx Nov 18 '13 at 2:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to initialise record[0] firstly.

Record[] record=new Record[100];
record[0] = new Record();
record[0].year=(byte)12;

This is different with C/C++. In Java, each element of an object array needs initialisation .

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You should add Records to array

Record[] record=new Record[100];

for (int i = 0; i < record.length; i++){
   record[i] = new Record(val, year);
}

This is considering you have a constructor Record(float val, byte year);

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By default arrays of objects are filled with nulls so what you are doing in

record[0].year=(byte)12;

is in fact

null.year=(byte)12;

but null doesn't have its class so it doesn't have year field. To solve this problem you need to first fill your array with new objects of Record class like

Record[] record = new Record[100];
for (int i = 0; i < record.length; i++)
    record[i] = new Record();

//now you can safely use
record[0].year = (byte)12;

I just noticed that Record is private class which means that it is inner class. While you will be able to create its instances in non-static method via new Record() to create it in static method you will need first instance of its outer class. In that case your code can look like

OuterClass myOuterClassInstance = new OuterClass();
Record[] record = new Record[100];
for (int i = 0; i < record.length; i++)
    record[i] = myOuterClassInstance.new Record();

//now you can safely use
record[0].year = (byte)12;
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