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Im using a market data source implementation that contains .so.0 files. However these are 'soft links' to actual .so.0.0.0 files. Why is this done?

When I try to copy these .so.0 links, it ends up copying an exact replica of the .so.0.0.0 file but with a .so.0 prefix.

Added comment:

so I have a libfoo.so file, and it is being accessed by java through jni. This libfoo.so file is actually a soft link that points to libfoo.so.0.0.0 What happens if I don't have libfoo.so. How does java/or any other compiled code, figure out that libfoo.so.0.0.0 if the shared object to use?

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what is a 'market data source'? What are these files? What does this have to do with Java? –  bmargulies Jan 5 '10 at 3:07
    
I believe that "market data source" is probably a COTS data connection solution of some sort that ships its implementation in a shared object file, but I'm not a Java programmer ;) –  D.Shawley Jan 5 '10 at 3:44
    
This is not related to java - your so files are found by a platform-dependent application, for instance ld on Linux. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 5 '10 at 15:59
    
Please don't down vote just because you don't know the answer... –  QueueHammer Jan 5 '10 at 16:01

3 Answers 3

This is so programs can bind to either any version of libfoo that has the same interface (I want the latest updates to libfoo), or bind to a specific version (I want stability and only the exact version I tested against).

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so I have a libfoo.so file, and it is being accessed by java through jni. This libfoo.so file is actually a soft link that points to libfoo.so.0.0.0 What happens if I don't have libfoo.so. How does java/or any other compiled code, figure out that libfoo.so.0.0.0 if the shared object to use? –  user242591 Jan 5 '10 at 3:31
    
Read the ld man page, if on Linux. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 5 '10 at 16:00
    
If you have libfoo.so.0.0.0 you should always have libfoo.so.0 and libfoo.so, this is part of how libtool works; if it doesn't exist, they're generating the libraries wrong –  Paul Betts Jan 5 '10 at 23:15

The .0 and .0.0.0 files exist so that versioning can happen:

  • foo.0 represents the .0 version of a library. All .0 versions of the library will use the same interface, but there may be different implementations. (Hopefully, the later implementations will have fewer bugs than the earlier ones.)

  • foo.0.0.0 represents a specific implementation of the .0 version.

It's not useful, now, to have the soft-link. But here's what could happen:

The programmer of foo finds a bug in his library. He releases foo.0.0.1. And foo.0 now links to foo.0.0.1. Then two things happen:

  • All files that link to foo.0 will automatically update to foo.0.0.1.
  • All files that link to foo.0.0.0 will continue to use the old foo.0.0.0
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Extend this a few levels further and you can require an exact version match by linking against libfoo.0.0.0 or any matching interface version with libfoo.0 or any version at all with libfoo. –  D.Shawley Jan 5 '10 at 3:46
    
Apologise for the basic question, but how is this linking specified. How can I specify that jni should use libfoo.so and not libfoo.so.0.0.0? –  user242591 Jan 5 '10 at 5:04
    
Hihi, coder zambesi. Sadly, Java documents are not much help: java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… says "The manner in which a library name is mapped to the actual system library is system dependent." There might be some help at stackoverflow.com/questions/1010503/… Good luck. –  Chip Uni Jan 5 '10 at 5:20

I struggled to understand this topic for a while; here's a good link that helped me make sense of it.

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