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I wrote the following code:

int main()
{
    int i;
    int arr[4];
    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        arr[i] = 0;

    return 0;
}

saved it in two files: test.c and test.cpp
I run the following commands:

gcc -O0 test.c
objdump -Mintel -d a.out > decompilec
g++ -O0 test.cpp
objdump -Mintel -d a.out > decompilecpp

I edited both decompilec and decompilecpp to contain just the main function.

Now, I run diff decompilec decompilecpp and I get the following output:

12,21c12,19
<  80483fe: 7e eb                   jle    80483eb <main+0xf>
<  8048400: b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
<  8048405: c9                      leave  
<  8048406: c3                      ret    
<  8048407: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
<  8048409: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
<  804840b: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
<  804840d: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
<  804840f: 90                      nop
< 
---
>  80483fe: 0f 9e c0                setle  al
>  8048401: 84 c0                   test   al,al
>  8048403: 75 e6                   jne    80483eb <main+0xf>
>  8048405: b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
>  804840a: c9                      leave  
>  804840b: c3                      ret    
>  804840c: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
>  804840e: 66 90                   xchg   ax,ax

can any body explain this differences?

here are the files:

decompilec

080483dc <main>:
 80483dc:   55                      push   ebp
 80483dd:   89 e5                   mov    ebp,esp
 80483df:   83 ec 20                sub    esp,0x20
 80483e2:   c7 45 ec 00 00 00 00    mov    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x0
 80483e9:   eb 0f                   jmp    80483fa <main+0x1e>
 80483eb:   8b 45 ec                mov    eax,DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14]
 80483ee:   c7 44 85 f0 00 00 00    mov    DWORD PTR [ebp+eax*4-0x10],0x0
 80483f5:   00 
 80483f6:   83 45 ec 01             add    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x1
 80483fa:   83 7d ec 03             cmp    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x3
 80483fe:   7e eb                   jle    80483eb <main+0xf>
 8048400:   b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
 8048405:   c9                      leave  
 8048406:   c3                      ret    
 8048407:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
 8048409:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
 804840b:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
 804840d:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
 804840f:   90                      nop

decompilecpp

080483dc <main>:
 80483dc:   55                      push   ebp
 80483dd:   89 e5                   mov    ebp,esp
 80483df:   83 ec 20                sub    esp,0x20
 80483e2:   c7 45 ec 00 00 00 00    mov    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x0
 80483e9:   eb 0f                   jmp    80483fa <main+0x1e>
 80483eb:   8b 45 ec                mov    eax,DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14]
 80483ee:   c7 44 85 f0 00 00 00    mov    DWORD PTR [ebp+eax*4-0x10],0x0
 80483f5:   00 
 80483f6:   83 45 ec 01             add    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x1
 80483fa:   83 7d ec 03             cmp    DWORD PTR [ebp-0x14],0x3
 80483fe:   0f 9e c0                setle  al
 8048401:   84 c0                   test   al,al
 8048403:   75 e6                   jne    80483eb <main+0xf>
 8048405:   b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
 804840a:   c9                      leave  
 804840b:   c3                      ret    
 804840c:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax
 804840e:   66 90                   xchg   ax,ax

as requested, here is the output of gcc -v:

Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=gcc
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.7/lto-wrapper
Target: i686-linux-gnu
Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.7/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,go,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --prefix=/usr --program-suffix=-4.7 --enable-shared --enable-linker-build-id --with-system-zlib --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.7 --libdir=/usr/lib --enable-nls --with-sysroot=/ --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-libstdcxx-time=yes --enable-gnu-unique-object --enable-plugin --enable-objc-gc --enable-targets=all --disable-werror --with-arch-32=i686 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=i686-linux-gnu --host=i686-linux-gnu --target=i686-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.7.2 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-2ubuntu1) 
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2  
So you expect C and C++ to produce identical machine instructions? If so, why? The machine instructions need to be equivalent, not identical. So the question is, are they equivalent?. But then, do you know enough assembly to understand them? –  Nawaz Nov 18 '13 at 8:48
3  
I can't believe there's a nearly identical question from a year and a half ago: stackoverflow.com/questions/9338164/… –  Michael Burr Nov 18 '13 at 8:51
1  
This seems like a perfectly reasonable question that contains enough code to reproduce the issue and the specific problem encountered. I hope it gets reopened! –  templatetypedef Nov 18 '13 at 8:57
2  
Also, this GCC bug report (fixed) may have something to do with this: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=42027 –  Michael Burr Nov 18 '13 at 8:57
3  
Guys, have you been smoking something? This is a zero-initialize loop with a constant number of iterations (and, what's best, on a variable that isn't used otherwise and immediately goes out of scope afterwards). Turning on -O1 will almost certainly strip out the entire code and reduce the program to int main(){return 0;}, regardless of what compiler is used or what bugs it might have. What's the point of even trying to divine something out of an empty main function? :-) –  Damon Nov 18 '13 at 13:59
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2 Answers

There is any number of ways you can perform some particular operation with assembler. Especially when you do any optimization, which may intimately depend on the targeted CPU, the assembler may have non-obvious operations, which are there basically to make a particular CPU work faster. Even though you have same compiler and same optimization flag, the actual compiler used is still different for C and C++, so they may produce different code.

The C assembly should be straightforward. The C++ version is more interesting. What happens there is explained at this link. Basically they convert the straightforward "jump if less or equal" of C code into "set to zero or nonzero depending on if less or equal, then jump based on zero or nonzero".

I don't know why the C++ compiler produces such code. It might get changed with higher optimization level, or then it is produced even by optimization level 0, because it helps branch prediction of the default CPU to produce the right prediction most of the time. And then the C compiler has different default behavior. As I already said, the actual compiler is different, so I'm actually a bit amazed the code is identical otherwise!

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Different languages use different compiler frontends which may produce different streams of instructions (of otherwise equivalent semantic effects).

If you were optimizing the output, it is probable (though not guaranteed) that the optimizer would reduce both instructions streams to the same output... but there is no guarantee, and I do not see why you would expect any.

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