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I have a server-client communication using boost interprocess shared memory with conditions. While in the client I can initialize the shared memory once and wait for messages in a loop like this:

    try
{
    //open the shared memory object
    windows_shared_memory shm (open_only, "MySharedMemory", read_write);
    //map the whole shared memory in this process
    mapped_region region (shm, read_write);
    //get the address of the mapped region
    void * addr = region.get_address();
    //construct the shared structure in memory
    shared_memory_graphic_element *data = static_cast <shared_memory_graphic_element*>(addr);
    //read information until the other process marks the end
bool end_loop = false;
do {
    //lock the mutex
    scoped_lock<interprocess_mutex> lock(data->mutex);
    //get shared memory data
    if (!data->dataIn) {
        data->cond_empty.wait(lock);
    }
    if (std::strcmp(data->dataPointer, "last_message") == 0) {
        end_loop = true;
    }
    else 
    {
        //read the shared memory data and use it ...
            //notify the other process that the buffer is empty
        data->dataIn = false;
        data->cond_full.notify_one();
    }
} while (!end_loop);
}
catch (interprocess_exception &ex) 
{
  //handle exception;
}

In the server, I cannot loop on data as it is not available all at once, so I would like to initialize shared memory only once and write in it several times. I tried to declare as private variables the data structure and the shared memory object like this:

private:
  shared_memory_graphic_element *data;
  windows_shared_memory shm;

Then initialize them in a method:

void MyClass::initShareMem()
{
 try
 {
             shm = windows_shared_memory (open_or_create, "MySharedMemory", read_write, sizeof (shared_memory_graphic_element));


 }
 catch (interprocess_exception &ex)
 {
  printf ("interprocess_exception when creating shared memory");
      return;
 }
}

and use them in another one:

void MyClass::SendData()
{
     try
 {
    //map the whole shared memory in this process
      mapped_region region(shm, read_write);
      //get the address of the mapped region
      void * addr = region.get_address();
      //construct the shared structure in memory
      data = new (addr) shared_memory_graphic_element;  
      //write message
       scoped_lock<interprocess_mutex> lock (data->mutex);
       if (data->dataIn)        //waits until there is no data in the shared zone (goes through at first call)
       {
           data->cond_full.wait(lock);
       }
       //fill-in data fields...
       //notify the other process that there is a message
       data->cond_empty.notify_one();
       //mark message buffer as full
       data->dataIn = true;
  }
  catch (interprocess_exception &ex)
  {
      return;
  }
}

The method SendData() is called in a loop and clients gets data, it works once. But when I call SendData again, the client process which waits on data->cond_empty.wait(lock) is not unlocked anymore. I have no clues anymore... Does anyone see what could be the cause? Is it allowed to have the shared memory as class variable and initialize it as I do?

share|improve this question
    
Your loop always has the mutex locked. The other process might break in just once, when it happens to start earlier, but can never acquire the mutex again. Deadlock. Only acquire the mutex when you actually need to access the shared memory, either when you read or write. Not while you wait for data to appear. –  Hans Passant Nov 18 '13 at 11:38
    
As far as I understood from the boost documentation boost.org/doc/libs/1_38_0/doc/html/interprocess/…, the condition allows to know when data is available in the shared memory. When my client process checks if there's data like this: ` scoped_lock<interprocess_mutex> lock(data->mutex); if (!data->dataIn) { data->cond_empty.wait(lock); }` it needs to lock the mutex because it accesses the shared memory, right? –  user3004069 Nov 18 '13 at 14:48
    
Same rule for the client, it must only lock after it knows that data is available. Then read the data and unlock again. The lock should never be held for more than a microsecond by either process if you do it right. –  Hans Passant Nov 18 '13 at 14:51

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