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Symbols are usually represented as such

:book_author_title

but if I have a string:

"Book Author Title"

is there a built in way in rails/ruby to convert it into a symbol where I can use the : notation without just doing a raw string regex replace?

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Rather than conversion, you migh be interested in indifferent access - methods working equally for both string and symbol parameters. –  Boris Stitnicky Jun 12 '13 at 4:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 156 down vote accepted

Rails got ActiveSupport::CoreExtensions::String::Inflections module that provides such methods. They're all worth looking at. For your example:

'Book Author Title'.parameterize.underscore.to_sym
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this works really well! you could have any words weather or not they where Capitalized. the parameterize will sort it out. –  TheLegend Apr 18 '12 at 14:00

from: http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/String.html#M000809

str.intern => symbol
str.to_sym => symbol

Returns the Symbol corresponding to str, creating the symbol if it did not previously exist. See Symbol#id2name.

"Koala".intern         #=> :Koala
s = 'cat'.to_sym       #=> :cat
s == :cat              #=> true
s = '@cat'.to_sym      #=> :@cat
s == :@cat             #=> true

This can also be used to create symbols that cannot be represented using the :xxx notation.

'cat and dog'.to_sym   #=> :"cat and dog"

But for your example ...

"Book Author Title".gsub(/\s+/, "_").downcase.to_sym

should go ;)

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Brilliant examples. Thank you. –  Paul Oct 5 '12 at 9:51
2  
The original poster may have been happy with the Rails answer, but this post answers the actual question asked. –  Russ Bateman Sep 24 '13 at 21:01
1  
It is not true that "[to_sym] can also be used to create symbols that cannot be represented using the :xxx notation". :'cat and dog' is the same as 'cat and dog'.to_sym. –  anthropomorphic Dec 9 '13 at 9:38
2  
One can even do such outlandish things as :"cat and dog\n on a new line" without the need for to_sym. –  anthropomorphic Dec 9 '13 at 9:42
"Book Author Title".parameterize('_').to_sym
=> :book_author_title

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveSupport/Inflector.html#method-i-parameterize

parameterize is a rails method, and it lets you choose what you want the separator to be. It is a dash "-" by default.

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thanks the parameterize with option helped :) –  Francois May 21 '13 at 11:23

In Rails you can do this using underscore method:

"Book Author Title".delete(' ').underscore.to_sym
=> :book_author_title

The simpler code is using regex (works with Ruby):

"Book Author Title".downcase.gsub(/\s+/, "_").to_sym
=> :book_author_title
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1  
this will only work if all the words start with a capital, if it was "my fat Dog" it will return :myfat_dog. –  TheLegend Apr 18 '12 at 13:57

intern → symbol Returns the Symbol corresponding to str, creating the symbol if it did not previously exist

"edition".intern # :edition

http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.0/String.html#method-i-intern

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Is this what you're looking for?:

:"Book Author Title"

:)

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I'm a bit late but this works too

Use this function(Looks Nicer):

def getSymbol(string)
    eval(':'+string)
end

Call it like:

getSymbol('test') 

returns :test

Or simply just do

string = 'test'
eval(':'+string)
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