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Is it possible to do something like this in C#:

public void DoSomething<T>(T t)  
{
    if (T is MyClass)
    {
        MyClass mc = (MyClass)t 
        ...
    }
    else if (T is List<MyClass>)
    {
        List<MyClass> lmc = (List<MyClass>)t
        ...
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Yes:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(MyClass))
{
    MyClass mc = (MyClass)(object) t;
}
else if (typeof(T) == typeof(List<MyClass>))
{
    List<MyClass> lmc = (List<MyClass>)(object) t;
}

It's slightly odd that you need to go via a cast to object, but that's just the way that generics work - there aren't as many conversions from a generic type as you might expect.

Of course another alternative is to use the normal execution time check:

MyClass mc = t as MyClass;
if (mc != null)
{
    // ...
}
else
{
    List<MyClass> lmc = t as List<MyClass>;
    if (lmc != null)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

That will behave differently to the first code block if t is null, of course.

I would try to avoid this kind of code where possible, however - it can be necessary sometimes, but the idea of generic methods is to be able to write generic code which works the same way for any type.

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I actually have a little more complicated issue. What if MyClass derives from MyBaseClass and there are many more MyClasses all of which deriving from MyBaseClass? –  synergetic Jan 5 '10 at 6:41
    
@synergetic: You've described the type hierarchy, but not what you want to do with it. You can use reflection (e.g. typeof(T).BaseType or typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(...) to explore the type hierarchy if that's useful. I'd still try to avoid it if possible though :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 5 '10 at 7:35
    
Hate to be a wet towel here, but this answer falls short in cases where T is actually a boxed type (ex: object boxedMyClass = new MyClass()). In cases like this, the type returned by the typeof operator will be object, not MyClass, causing the above typeof check to fail. In my opinion, this is where C# falls short as a language: dealing with both generic type vetting & complex ontological logic (ex. there's no way to say something like "aLifeform is Mammal and not Bear" in C# w/o getting into reflection). –  rmiesen Nov 30 '12 at 17:14
    
@rmiesen: It's not clear what you mean here. Note that boxing doesn't get involved in the first place for classes. T will be whatever you specify it to be, but it's the compile-time type. If you want the execution-time type of an object, call GetType. –  Jon Skeet Nov 30 '12 at 17:43
    
@JonSkeet: I would like to avoid such implementation (God method that's able to digest any type) but am not able to see how to do it without runtime type checking. Suppose the generic method's signature is something like: T Obfuscate<T>(T value) where T : IConvertible so it can obfuscate value types and strings (let's pretend enums are not part of IConvertible). How can one implement such generic method without implementing it for each individual passed type value? stackoverflow.com/q/23957027/75642 –  Robert Koritnik May 30 '14 at 14:30

I believe there's something wrong in your design. You want to compare between types in an already generic method. Generics are meant to deal with type-variable situation. I recommend to do it this way..

//Generic Overload 1
public void DoSomething<T>(T t)
    where T : MyClass
{
    ...
}

//Generic Overload 2
public void DoSomething<T>(T t)
    where T : List<MyClass>
{
    ...
}
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For that matter, you can just drop the generics and specify the type of your parameter. But +1 because I wanted to have polymorphism without parameters. –  Jesdisciple Jan 15 '14 at 19:58
2  
How exactly does this work? As pointed out here stackoverflow.com/questions/15367032/… "you can't overload by generic constraints". –  Miebster Nov 13 '14 at 19:48

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